In female animals, energy metabolism and fertility are tightly connected, and reciprocally regulated. However, the relative contributions of metabolic and reproductive pathways have changed over the course of evolution. In oviparous animals, metabolic factors take precedence over fertility, enabling egg production to be inhibited in a nutritionally poor environment. By contrast, in placental mammals, the opposite occurs: the need to feed a developing embryo and neonate forces metabolic pathways to adapt to these reproductive needs. This physiological necessity explains why in female mammals alterations of gonadal activity, including age-dependent cessation of ovarian functions, are associated with a disruption of metabolic homeostasis and consequent inflammatory reactions that trigger the onset of metabolic, cardiovascular, skeletal and neural pathologies. This Review discusses how metabolic homeostasis and reproductive functions interact to optimize female fertility and explains the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the disordered energy metabolism associated with human ovarian dysfunction owing to menopause, polycystic ovary syndrome and Turner syndrome. Finally, this article highlights how hormone replacement therapy might aid the restoration of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunction.

Energy metabolism and fertility: a balance preserved for female health / S. Della Torre, V. Benedusi, R. Fontana, A. Maggi. - In: NATURE REVIEWS. ENDOCRINOLOGY. - ISSN 1759-5029. - 10:1(2014 Jan), pp. 13-23. [10.1038/nrendo.2013.203]

Energy metabolism and fertility: a balance preserved for female health

S. Della Torre
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
V. Benedusi
Secondo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
A. Maggi
Ultimo
Supervision
2014-01

Abstract

In female animals, energy metabolism and fertility are tightly connected, and reciprocally regulated. However, the relative contributions of metabolic and reproductive pathways have changed over the course of evolution. In oviparous animals, metabolic factors take precedence over fertility, enabling egg production to be inhibited in a nutritionally poor environment. By contrast, in placental mammals, the opposite occurs: the need to feed a developing embryo and neonate forces metabolic pathways to adapt to these reproductive needs. This physiological necessity explains why in female mammals alterations of gonadal activity, including age-dependent cessation of ovarian functions, are associated with a disruption of metabolic homeostasis and consequent inflammatory reactions that trigger the onset of metabolic, cardiovascular, skeletal and neural pathologies. This Review discusses how metabolic homeostasis and reproductive functions interact to optimize female fertility and explains the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the disordered energy metabolism associated with human ovarian dysfunction owing to menopause, polycystic ovary syndrome and Turner syndrome. Finally, this article highlights how hormone replacement therapy might aid the restoration of metabolic homeostasis in women with ovarian dysfunction.
Estrogen-receptor-alpha; polycystic-ovary-syndrome; nonalcoholic fatty liver; induced inflammatory response; cardiovascular risk-factors; turner-syndrome; insulin-resistance; gene-expression; food-intake; vitellogenin synthesis
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
Role of the Liver Estrogen Receptor in female Energy Metabolism, Reproduction and Aging: What About Your Liver Sexual Functions?
Imaging of Neuroinflammation in Neurodegenerative Diseases
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/645181
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