Population increase, stability, or decrease are expressions of social forces and human interaction with the environment. Children's social and economic role varies from class to class and presents potential parents with an inverse proportion quandary: an extra member of the group versus the financial difficulties involved in bringing up an extra child, with a lower impact if this latter is put to work young. Children are always the result of procreational decisions as unwanted pregnancies can be responded to with abortions, abandonment, or infanticide. In our species overall population trends are represented by three successive logistic curves. The first point at which the curve begins the logistic trend, raising population levels, is the shift from hunting and gathering to settled agriculture. The second point is the onset of the Industrial Revolution, namely the large‐scale use of fossil fuels, at the origin of modern exponential population growth.

Population dynamics / D. Danna - In: The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology / [a cura di] G. Ritzer, C. Rojek. - [s.l] : Wiley, 2018. - ISBN 9781405165518. - pp. 1-7 [10.1002/9781405165518.wbeos1170]

Population dynamics

D. Danna
2018

Abstract

Population increase, stability, or decrease are expressions of social forces and human interaction with the environment. Children's social and economic role varies from class to class and presents potential parents with an inverse proportion quandary: an extra member of the group versus the financial difficulties involved in bringing up an extra child, with a lower impact if this latter is put to work young. Children are always the result of procreational decisions as unwanted pregnancies can be responded to with abortions, abandonment, or infanticide. In our species overall population trends are represented by three successive logistic curves. The first point at which the curve begins the logistic trend, raising population levels, is the shift from hunting and gathering to settled agriculture. The second point is the onset of the Industrial Revolution, namely the large‐scale use of fossil fuels, at the origin of modern exponential population growth.
Settore SPS/07 - Sociologia Generale
Settore SPS/08 - Sociologia dei Processi Culturali e Comunicativi
Settore SPS/10 - Sociologia dell'Ambiente e del Territorio
Settore SPS/09 - Sociologia dei Processi economici e del Lavoro
Book Part (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
population dynamics.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 481.33 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
481.33 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/641636
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact