Because children with heart failure live longer both before and after cardiac transplantation, there is renewed focus on the quality and preservation of their intellectual functioning and psychosocial health. Children with chronic heart failure are at risk for delays in both cognitive development and psychologic functioning, though the extent and permanence of impairment is not well understood. Children with medically managed heart failure have been shown to be at increased risk for anxiety and depression, with a prevalence of emotional disorders similar to that of other children with congenital heart disease. The use of ventricular assist devices as a bridge to transplantation offers both risks and benefits for the preservation of intellectual and emotional function, with an increased risk for ischemic injury to the brain, but offers the advantage of allowing for cognitive stimulation and improved social interactions. A new population of children with heart failure, those outfitted with permanent ventricular assist devices in lieu of cardiac transplantation, may represent a particular risk group regarding social and cognitive function, but as of yet this is not well studied. Early intervention and school accommodations are recommended for those with cognitive, social, or emotional deficits, and brain imaging should be considered for those with persistent difficulties. Whenever possible, patients should be referred to psychologists and developmental specialists with experience in treating this patient population.

Cognitive and psycholologic considerations in pediatric heart failure / S.A. Hollander, E. Callus. - In: JOURNAL OF CARDIAC FAILURE. - ISSN 1071-9164. - 20:10(2014), pp. 782-785. [10.1016/j.cardfail.2014.07.001]

Cognitive and psycholologic considerations in pediatric heart failure

E. Callus
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2014

Abstract

Because children with heart failure live longer both before and after cardiac transplantation, there is renewed focus on the quality and preservation of their intellectual functioning and psychosocial health. Children with chronic heart failure are at risk for delays in both cognitive development and psychologic functioning, though the extent and permanence of impairment is not well understood. Children with medically managed heart failure have been shown to be at increased risk for anxiety and depression, with a prevalence of emotional disorders similar to that of other children with congenital heart disease. The use of ventricular assist devices as a bridge to transplantation offers both risks and benefits for the preservation of intellectual and emotional function, with an increased risk for ischemic injury to the brain, but offers the advantage of allowing for cognitive stimulation and improved social interactions. A new population of children with heart failure, those outfitted with permanent ventricular assist devices in lieu of cardiac transplantation, may represent a particular risk group regarding social and cognitive function, but as of yet this is not well studied. Early intervention and school accommodations are recommended for those with cognitive, social, or emotional deficits, and brain imaging should be considered for those with persistent difficulties. Whenever possible, patients should be referred to psychologists and developmental specialists with experience in treating this patient population.
Heart failure; cognitive; psychologic; ventricular assist; transplantation
Settore M-PSI/08 - Psicologia Clinica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/625929
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