The present article questions whether and to what extent daughters and sons learn how to Bdo gender^ in housework in Italy, a country with low levels of societal gender equality. Using nationally representative time use survey data from Italy (Italian National Institute of Statistics, 2014, waves 2002–2003 and 2008–2009), where daily time use diaries are collected for entire households, logistic models investigate to what extent children (age 6–12), teenagers (age 13–19), and young adults (ages 20–25) participate in domestic chores and whether paternal involvement in housework (controlling for parental education and employment status) is positively associated with children’s participation in domestic chores. The results indicate that daughters are more likely to engage in domestic chores than are sons at all ages and that the gender gap is wider among young adults and teenagers than among children. Moreover, although both sons and daughters are more likely to engage in housework if their father does so, the effect of paternal involvement is much stronger for sons than daughters. These patterns suggest that the learning of housework is a gendered process—a finding that has important implications for the reproduction of gender inequalities in Italy and possibly elsewhere.

Undoing Gender in Housework? Participation in Domestic Chores by Italian Fathers and Children of Different Ages / G. Dotti Sani. - In: SEX ROLES. - ISSN 0360-0025. - 74:9-10(2016), pp. 411-421.

Undoing Gender in Housework? Participation in Domestic Chores by Italian Fathers and Children of Different Ages

G. Dotti Sani
2016

Abstract

The present article questions whether and to what extent daughters and sons learn how to Bdo gender^ in housework in Italy, a country with low levels of societal gender equality. Using nationally representative time use survey data from Italy (Italian National Institute of Statistics, 2014, waves 2002–2003 and 2008–2009), where daily time use diaries are collected for entire households, logistic models investigate to what extent children (age 6–12), teenagers (age 13–19), and young adults (ages 20–25) participate in domestic chores and whether paternal involvement in housework (controlling for parental education and employment status) is positively associated with children’s participation in domestic chores. The results indicate that daughters are more likely to engage in domestic chores than are sons at all ages and that the gender gap is wider among young adults and teenagers than among children. Moreover, although both sons and daughters are more likely to engage in housework if their father does so, the effect of paternal involvement is much stronger for sons than daughters. These patterns suggest that the learning of housework is a gendered process—a finding that has important implications for the reproduction of gender inequalities in Italy and possibly elsewhere.
Division of labor; Family relations; Socialization; Social norms; Childrearing practices; Father child relations
Settore SPS/07 - Sociologia Generale
Settore SECS-S/05 - Statistica Sociale
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
SERS DottiSani 2016 publisher.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 436.77 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
436.77 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
SERS DottiSani 2016 pre-print.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Pre-print (manoscritto inviato all'editore)
Dimensione 1.12 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.12 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/625915
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 12
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact