Objectives: Stem cells have the ability to rescue and/or repair injured tissue. In humans, it is possible to isolate different types of stem cells from the body. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. In particular they represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. Sources: An electronic search was conducted on PubMed databases and supplemented with a manual study of relevant references. Results: All research described in this review highlight that DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that could be used in clinical applications. Unfortunately, very few clinical trials have been reported. Major obstacles imposed on researchers are hindering the translation of potentially effective therapies to the clinic. Both researchers and regulatory institutions need to develop a new approach to this problem, drawing up a new policy for good manufacturing practice (GMP) procedures. We strongly suggest that only general rules be standardized rather than everything. Importantly, this would not have an effect on the safety of patients, but may very well affect the results, which cannot be identical for all patients, due to physiological diversity in the biology of each patient. Alternatively, it would be important to study the role of specific molecules that recruit endogenous stem cells for tissue regeneration. In this way, the clinical use of stem cells could be successfully developed. Conclusions: DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate into different tissues, maintain their characteristics after cryopreservation, differentiate into bone-like tissues when loaded on scaffolds in animal models, and regenerate bone in human grafts. In summary, all data reported up to now should encourage the development of clinical procedures using DPSCs.

Dental pulp stem cells : state of the art and suggestions for a true translation of research into therapy / M. La Noce, F. Paino, A. Spina, P. Naddeo, R. Montella, V. Desiderio, A. De Rosa, G. Papaccio, V. Tirino, L. Laino. - In: JOURNAL OF DENTISTRY. - ISSN 0300-5712. - 42:7(2014), pp. 761-768. [10.1016/j.jdent.2014.02.018]

Dental pulp stem cells : state of the art and suggestions for a true translation of research into therapy

F. Paino;
2014

Abstract

Objectives: Stem cells have the ability to rescue and/or repair injured tissue. In humans, it is possible to isolate different types of stem cells from the body. Among these, dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are relatively easily obtainable and exhibit high plasticity and multipotential capabilities. In particular they represent a gold standard for neural-crest-derived bone reconstruction in humans and can be used for the repair of body defects in low-risk autologous therapeutic strategies. Sources: An electronic search was conducted on PubMed databases and supplemented with a manual study of relevant references. Results: All research described in this review highlight that DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that could be used in clinical applications. Unfortunately, very few clinical trials have been reported. Major obstacles imposed on researchers are hindering the translation of potentially effective therapies to the clinic. Both researchers and regulatory institutions need to develop a new approach to this problem, drawing up a new policy for good manufacturing practice (GMP) procedures. We strongly suggest that only general rules be standardized rather than everything. Importantly, this would not have an effect on the safety of patients, but may very well affect the results, which cannot be identical for all patients, due to physiological diversity in the biology of each patient. Alternatively, it would be important to study the role of specific molecules that recruit endogenous stem cells for tissue regeneration. In this way, the clinical use of stem cells could be successfully developed. Conclusions: DPSCs are mesenchymal stem cells that differentiate into different tissues, maintain their characteristics after cryopreservation, differentiate into bone-like tissues when loaded on scaffolds in animal models, and regenerate bone in human grafts. In summary, all data reported up to now should encourage the development of clinical procedures using DPSCs.
Adult stem cells; Bone regeneration; Human grafts; Scaffold; Stem cell therapy; Tissue engineering; Biological Specimen Banks; Cell Culture Techniques; Dental Pulp; Humans; Mesenchymal Stromal Cells; Multipotent Stem Cells; Tissue Engineering; Translational Medical Research; Dentistry (all)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/625561
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