The link diet-cognitive function/dementia has been largely investigated in observational studies; however, there was a lack of evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the prevention of late-life cognitive disorders though dietary intervention in cognitively healthy older adults. In the present article, we systematically reviewed RCTs published in the last four years (2014-2017) exploring nutritional intervention efficacy in preventing the onset of late-life cognitive disorders and dementia in cognitively healthy subjects aged 60 years and older using different levels of investigation (i.e., dietary pattern changes/medical food/nutraceutical supplementation/multidomain approach and dietary macro- and micronutrient approaches) as well as possible underlying mechanisms of nutritional prevention. From the 35 included RCTs, there was moderate evidence that intervention through dietary pattern changes, medical food/nutraceutical supplementation, and multidomain approach improved specific cognitive domains or cognitive-related blood biomarkers. There was high evidence that protein supplementation improved specific cognitive domains or functional status in prefrail older adults without effect.

Nutritional Intervention as a Preventive Approach for Cognitive-Related Outcomes in Cognitively Healthy Older Adults : a Systematic Review / V. Solfrizzi, P. Agosti, M. Lozupone, C. Custodero, A. Schilardi, V. Valiani, R. Sardone, V. Dibello, L. Di Lena, A. Lamanna, R. Stallone, A. Bellomo, A. Greco, A. Daniele, D. Seripa, C. Sabbà, G. Logroscino, F. Panza. - In: JOURNAL OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE. - ISSN 1387-2877. - 64:suppl. 1(2018), pp. S229-S254. [10.3233/JAD-179940]

Nutritional Intervention as a Preventive Approach for Cognitive-Related Outcomes in Cognitively Healthy Older Adults : a Systematic Review

P. Agosti;
2018

Abstract

The link diet-cognitive function/dementia has been largely investigated in observational studies; however, there was a lack of evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the prevention of late-life cognitive disorders though dietary intervention in cognitively healthy older adults. In the present article, we systematically reviewed RCTs published in the last four years (2014-2017) exploring nutritional intervention efficacy in preventing the onset of late-life cognitive disorders and dementia in cognitively healthy subjects aged 60 years and older using different levels of investigation (i.e., dietary pattern changes/medical food/nutraceutical supplementation/multidomain approach and dietary macro- and micronutrient approaches) as well as possible underlying mechanisms of nutritional prevention. From the 35 included RCTs, there was moderate evidence that intervention through dietary pattern changes, medical food/nutraceutical supplementation, and multidomain approach improved specific cognitive domains or cognitive-related blood biomarkers. There was high evidence that protein supplementation improved specific cognitive domains or functional status in prefrail older adults without effect.
Alzheimer's disease; dementia; dietary pattern; healthy diet; macronutrients; medical food; Mediterranean diet; micronutrients; mild cognitive impairment; nutraceuticals; prevention; Neuroscience (all); Clinical Psychology; Geriatrics and Gerontology; Psychiatry and Mental Health
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
Settore MED/26 - Neurologia
Settore MED/49 - Scienze Tecniche Dietetiche Applicate
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
jad179940.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 401.63 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
401.63 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/625279
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 12
  • Scopus 29
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 26
social impact