Summary: Quantifying short- and long-term availability of animal manure nitrogen (N) is of practical interest to ensure adequate crop yield, minimize N pollution and reduce inputs of mineral-N fertilizer. We measured short-term carbon (C) and N dynamics after one or six repeated additions to soil (every 56 days) of ammonium sulphate (AS) and undigested (PS) and anaerobically digested (DPS) pig slurry in a laboratory incubation experiment. Soil CO2 emissions, pH and mineral N (ammonium + nitrate) were measured during the period of 0–56 days following fertilizer additions. An accompanying experiment was conducted with similar but 15N-labelled fertilizers to measure soil mineral N 56 and 112 days after one, three or six repeated additions, and to estimate the increase in slurry available N after repeated additions. Nitrogen from slurries potentially available for plants (77–91, 44–58 and 57–66% of added N for AS, PS and DPS, respectively) was close to that supplied in mineral form with the fertilizer, indicating negligible net mineralization of slurry organic N, after both one and repeated additions. In fact, soil mineral N increased in most of the treatments because of repeated additions, but the increases were small, on average 0.5–2.1% of added N per period of 56 and 112 days. Calculations of availability of fertilizer N based on unlabelled N were equally precise compared with those estimated with 15N, but trends over time were more variable. We conclude that many repeated additions (simulating a long manuring history) are needed to obtain a marked increase in available slurry N, even under controlled conditions. Highlights: We studied slurry decomposition after single or repeated additions in two laboratory incubations We used unlabelled and 15N-labelled pig slurries to estimate N availability N potentially available for plants was close to that supplied in mineral form with slurries Slurry N availability increased with repeated additions, but residual effects were small for both slurries.

Nitrogen availability after repeated additions of raw and anaerobically digested 15N-labelled pig slurry / D. Cavalli, L. Bechini, A. Di Matteo, M. Corti, P. Ceccon, P. Marino Gallina. - In: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF SOIL SCIENCE. - ISSN 1351-0754. - 69:6(2018), pp. 1044-1055.

Nitrogen availability after repeated additions of raw and anaerobically digested 15N-labelled pig slurry

D. Cavalli
Primo
;
L. Bechini
Secondo
;
M. Corti
Penultimo
;
P. Marino Gallina
Ultimo
2018

Abstract

Summary: Quantifying short- and long-term availability of animal manure nitrogen (N) is of practical interest to ensure adequate crop yield, minimize N pollution and reduce inputs of mineral-N fertilizer. We measured short-term carbon (C) and N dynamics after one or six repeated additions to soil (every 56 days) of ammonium sulphate (AS) and undigested (PS) and anaerobically digested (DPS) pig slurry in a laboratory incubation experiment. Soil CO2 emissions, pH and mineral N (ammonium + nitrate) were measured during the period of 0–56 days following fertilizer additions. An accompanying experiment was conducted with similar but 15N-labelled fertilizers to measure soil mineral N 56 and 112 days after one, three or six repeated additions, and to estimate the increase in slurry available N after repeated additions. Nitrogen from slurries potentially available for plants (77–91, 44–58 and 57–66% of added N for AS, PS and DPS, respectively) was close to that supplied in mineral form with the fertilizer, indicating negligible net mineralization of slurry organic N, after both one and repeated additions. In fact, soil mineral N increased in most of the treatments because of repeated additions, but the increases were small, on average 0.5–2.1% of added N per period of 56 and 112 days. Calculations of availability of fertilizer N based on unlabelled N were equally precise compared with those estimated with 15N, but trends over time were more variable. We conclude that many repeated additions (simulating a long manuring history) are needed to obtain a marked increase in available slurry N, even under controlled conditions. Highlights: We studied slurry decomposition after single or repeated additions in two laboratory incubations We used unlabelled and 15N-labelled pig slurries to estimate N availability N potentially available for plants was close to that supplied in mineral form with slurries Slurry N availability increased with repeated additions, but residual effects were small for both slurries.
Soil Science
Settore AGR/02 - Agronomia e Coltivazioni Erbacee
Multi-regional Solution to improve the environmental and Economic Sustainability of PIG manure management in the Regional of the Po and Veneto basin
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/623056
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 5
social impact