Background: Traditionally, psychologists have been involved in identifying theminimumamount of physical activity needed to be healthy. Latest research has changed direction and is starting to shed some light on a new trend characterized by excessive physical activity, especially in young adults. Objectives: This study aimed at examining how an intense physical activity can have detrimental psychological effects and turn into an addiction with possible repercussion on health, especially when individuals continue to have maladaptive behaviors such as smoking and drinking. Patients and Methods: A convenience sample of 158 participants (female = 101; male = 57) was enrolled, with a mean age of 28 years (SD = 6.09). A questionnaire was administered to evaluate both the optimistic bias in smokers and drinkers and the time spent in physical activity. Results: Participants showing smoking and drinking behaviors were categorized according to the extent of performed physical activity. Descriptive analyses revealed that 26% of participants were "inactive", while 8.30% practiced "intense activity" and 8.30% practiced "extremely intense activity". Peoplewhohad 7 to 8 hours of physical activity per week estimated the risk of getting bladder cancer as "much below average" (P = 0.039). Consistent results were found for stroke (P = 0.015). Conclusions: This study aimed at offering an innovative starting point to examine more closely the role of such mechanism in individuals practicing intense and sometimes excessive physical activity. Our results may offer new hints for researchers working in the prevention and education of adolescents and young-adults.

Optimistic bias in physical activity : when exercise flows into addiction / S. Riva, M. Masiero, K. Mazzocco, G. Pravettoni. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HIGH RISK BEHAVIORS AND ADDICTION. - ISSN 2251-8711. - 7:3(2018), pp. e67697.1-e67697.5.

Optimistic bias in physical activity : when exercise flows into addiction

S. Riva;M. Masiero
;
K. Mazzocco;G. Pravettoni
2018

Abstract

Background: Traditionally, psychologists have been involved in identifying theminimumamount of physical activity needed to be healthy. Latest research has changed direction and is starting to shed some light on a new trend characterized by excessive physical activity, especially in young adults. Objectives: This study aimed at examining how an intense physical activity can have detrimental psychological effects and turn into an addiction with possible repercussion on health, especially when individuals continue to have maladaptive behaviors such as smoking and drinking. Patients and Methods: A convenience sample of 158 participants (female = 101; male = 57) was enrolled, with a mean age of 28 years (SD = 6.09). A questionnaire was administered to evaluate both the optimistic bias in smokers and drinkers and the time spent in physical activity. Results: Participants showing smoking and drinking behaviors were categorized according to the extent of performed physical activity. Descriptive analyses revealed that 26% of participants were "inactive", while 8.30% practiced "intense activity" and 8.30% practiced "extremely intense activity". Peoplewhohad 7 to 8 hours of physical activity per week estimated the risk of getting bladder cancer as "much below average" (P = 0.039). Consistent results were found for stroke (P = 0.015). Conclusions: This study aimed at offering an innovative starting point to examine more closely the role of such mechanism in individuals practicing intense and sometimes excessive physical activity. Our results may offer new hints for researchers working in the prevention and education of adolescents and young-adults.
Decision-making; Maladaptive health behavior choice; Optimistic bias; Physical activity; Medicine (miscellaneous); Clinical Psychology; Psychiatry and Mental Health
Settore M-PSI/01 - Psicologia Generale
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ijhrba-7-3-67697.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 105.52 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
105.52 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/622020
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact