Background: Healthy lifestyles are modifiable risk factors for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) onset and recurrence. While unhealthy lifestyles tend to cluster together within the general healthy population, little is known about the prevalence and clustering of these behaviours in people with ACS before and after the first acute event. The aim of this study was to identify lifestyle profiles of patients with ACS and to explore their change after their first coronary event. Methods: Three hundred and fifty-six patients completed self-report measures of healthy habits at the beginning of cardiac rehabilitation and 6 months later. By adopting a person-oriented approach, we analysed lifestyle clustering and its change over time. Differences in depression, anxiety, and negative illness perception among lifestyle profiles were assessed. Results: We identified seven profiles, ranging from more maladaptive to healthier clusters. Findings showed a strong interrelation among unhealthy habits in patients. We highlighted a moderate individual and group stability of cluster membership over time. Moreover, unhealthier lifestyle profiles were associated with higher levels of depression, anxiety, and negative illness perception. Conclusion: These results may have implications for the development and implementation of multimodal interventions addressing wider-ranging improvement in lifestyles by targeting multiple unhealthy behaviours in patients with ACS.

Clustering of Lifestyle Risk Factors in Acute Coronary Syndrome: Prevalence and Change after the First Event / D. Monzani, M. D'Addario, F. Fattirolli, C. Giannattasio, A. Greco, F. Quarenghi, P. Steca. - In: APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY. HEALTH AND WELL-BEING. - ISSN 1758-0846. - 10:3(2018 Nov), pp. 434-456. [10.1111/aphw.12141]

Clustering of Lifestyle Risk Factors in Acute Coronary Syndrome: Prevalence and Change after the First Event

D. Monzani
Primo
;
2018-11

Abstract

Background: Healthy lifestyles are modifiable risk factors for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) onset and recurrence. While unhealthy lifestyles tend to cluster together within the general healthy population, little is known about the prevalence and clustering of these behaviours in people with ACS before and after the first acute event. The aim of this study was to identify lifestyle profiles of patients with ACS and to explore their change after their first coronary event. Methods: Three hundred and fifty-six patients completed self-report measures of healthy habits at the beginning of cardiac rehabilitation and 6 months later. By adopting a person-oriented approach, we analysed lifestyle clustering and its change over time. Differences in depression, anxiety, and negative illness perception among lifestyle profiles were assessed. Results: We identified seven profiles, ranging from more maladaptive to healthier clusters. Findings showed a strong interrelation among unhealthy habits in patients. We highlighted a moderate individual and group stability of cluster membership over time. Moreover, unhealthier lifestyle profiles were associated with higher levels of depression, anxiety, and negative illness perception. Conclusion: These results may have implications for the development and implementation of multimodal interventions addressing wider-ranging improvement in lifestyles by targeting multiple unhealthy behaviours in patients with ACS.
acute coronary syndrome; behavioural change; healthy lifestyle; multiple risk factors; typological approach; Applied Psychology
Settore M-PSI/01 - Psicologia Generale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/621994
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