OBJECTIVE: We have previously demonstrated that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the success of resuscitation. In this study, we compared the effects of nasopharyngeal cooling with cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on resuscitation outcome in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation would yield better resuscitation outcome when compared with cold saline infusion. DESIGN: Randomized, prospective animal study. SETTING: University-affiliated research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). INTERVENTIONS: Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 14 pigs weighing 38 +/- 2 kg. After 15 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 mins before defibrillation. Coincident with the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, animals were randomly assigned to receive nasopharyngeal cooling with the aid of the RhinoChill Device (BeneChill, San Diego, CA) or cold saline infusion with 30 mL/kg 4 degrees C saline. One hour after restoration of spontaneous circulation, surface cooling was begun with the aid of a water blanket in both groups and maintained for 4 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Jugular vein temperature significantly decreased in animals subjected to nasopharyngeal cooling in comparison with those receiving cold saline infusion (p < .01). Core temperature, however, decreased only in animals receiving cold saline infusion (p < .01). Coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher in the animals treated with nasopharyngeal cooling (p = .02). All seven animals treated with nasopharyngeal cooling were successfully resuscitated in contrast to only two animals resuscitated in the cold saline infusion group (p = .02). CONCLUSION: In this model, nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved the success of resuscitation compared to cooling with cold saline infusion.

Survival and neurological outcomes after nasopharyngeal cooling or peripheral vein cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest / T. Yu, D. Barbut, G. Ristagno, J. Cho, S. Sun, Y. Li, M. Weil, W. Tang. - In: CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE. - ISSN 0090-3493. - 38:3(2010), pp. 916-921.

Survival and neurological outcomes after nasopharyngeal cooling or peripheral vein cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest

G. Ristagno;
2010

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We have previously demonstrated that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves the success of resuscitation. In this study, we compared the effects of nasopharyngeal cooling with cold saline infusion initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on resuscitation outcome in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest. We hypothesized that nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation would yield better resuscitation outcome when compared with cold saline infusion. DESIGN: Randomized, prospective animal study. SETTING: University-affiliated research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Yorkshire-X domestic pigs (Sus scrofa). INTERVENTIONS: Ventricular fibrillation was induced in 14 pigs weighing 38 +/- 2 kg. After 15 mins of untreated ventricular fibrillation, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 mins before defibrillation. Coincident with the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, animals were randomly assigned to receive nasopharyngeal cooling with the aid of the RhinoChill Device (BeneChill, San Diego, CA) or cold saline infusion with 30 mL/kg 4 degrees C saline. One hour after restoration of spontaneous circulation, surface cooling was begun with the aid of a water blanket in both groups and maintained for 4 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Jugular vein temperature significantly decreased in animals subjected to nasopharyngeal cooling in comparison with those receiving cold saline infusion (p < .01). Core temperature, however, decreased only in animals receiving cold saline infusion (p < .01). Coronary perfusion pressure was significantly higher in the animals treated with nasopharyngeal cooling (p = .02). All seven animals treated with nasopharyngeal cooling were successfully resuscitated in contrast to only two animals resuscitated in the cold saline infusion group (p = .02). CONCLUSION: In this model, nasopharyngeal cooling initiated during cardiopulmonary resuscitation improved the success of resuscitation compared to cooling with cold saline infusion.
cardiac arrest; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; hypothermia; ventricular fibrillation
Settore MED/41 - Anestesiologia
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/618338
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