Energy piles are emerging as convenient alternative to the more traditional Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) to provide heating/cooling to buildings, as they remove the need for special purpose excavations and can accommodate more pipes, thus enhancing energy performance. However, their different aspect ratio compared to BHEs requires different modelling tools and dedicated thermal response testing, to achieve adequate thermal design. In this work, the results of an extended multi-stage Thermal Response Test (TRT) carried out on a single energy pile installed in London Clay are presented in terms of both fluid temperature data and concrete temperature, measured by vibrating wire strain gauges and optic fibre sensors. The results are then explored in detail by means of a finite element numerical code, able to account for both convective heat exchange in the fluid, between the fluid and the solids and transient heat diffusion in the concrete and the ground. Analysis of the TRT field data shows that during the later stages of the test there is clear evidence of cyclic changes in performance. Investigation of these effects using the numerical model raises the possibility that there could be some alteration of the properties of the soil-pile contact during the test. Hypotheses for the observed behaviour are tentatively put forward and discussed with work recommended to further investigate the percieved phenomena.

Numerical analysis of thermal cycling during a multi-stage energy pile thermal response test / F. Cecinato, R. Piglialepre, F. Loveridge, D. Nicholson - In: Energy Geotechnics / [a cura di] S. Bauer, M. Sanchez, F. Wuttke. - [s.l] : CRC press, 2016. - ISBN 9781138032996. - pp. 593-599 (( Intervento presentato al 1. convegno ICEGT tenutosi a Kiel nel 2016 [10.1201/b21938-93].

Numerical analysis of thermal cycling during a multi-stage energy pile thermal response test

F. Cecinato
Primo
;
2016

Abstract

Energy piles are emerging as convenient alternative to the more traditional Borehole Heat Exchangers (BHEs) to provide heating/cooling to buildings, as they remove the need for special purpose excavations and can accommodate more pipes, thus enhancing energy performance. However, their different aspect ratio compared to BHEs requires different modelling tools and dedicated thermal response testing, to achieve adequate thermal design. In this work, the results of an extended multi-stage Thermal Response Test (TRT) carried out on a single energy pile installed in London Clay are presented in terms of both fluid temperature data and concrete temperature, measured by vibrating wire strain gauges and optic fibre sensors. The results are then explored in detail by means of a finite element numerical code, able to account for both convective heat exchange in the fluid, between the fluid and the solids and transient heat diffusion in the concrete and the ground. Analysis of the TRT field data shows that during the later stages of the test there is clear evidence of cyclic changes in performance. Investigation of these effects using the numerical model raises the possibility that there could be some alteration of the properties of the soil-pile contact during the test. Hypotheses for the observed behaviour are tentatively put forward and discussed with work recommended to further investigate the percieved phenomena.
Settore ICAR/07 - Geotecnica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/616381
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