Background: Stomach cancer mortality rates in South America are among the highest in the world. In Peru, stomach cancer has the highest absolute number of cancer deaths in both sexes combined. We estimated mortality rates for stomach cancer in Peru by sex and geographical region between 2008 and 2015. Methods: We obtained death data for stomach cancer from the Peruvian Ministry of Health database. We estimated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) per 100,000 persons using the direct method and the world standard population. Results: A total of 25,020 deaths from stomach cancer were identified in the study period. At national level, stomach cancer mortality rates (per 100,000 population) for men ranged from 9.8 in 2008 to 8.8 in 2015 with a percent change of - 16%, and for women from 8.8 in 2008 to 7.7 in 2015 with a percent change of -16.8%. The highlands had the highest mortality rates overall, mainly in Huancavelica and Huanuco. The rainforest had the lowest rates and the highest decline in stomach cancer ASMRs. The coast displayed intermediate rates overall. Conclusions: Within the study period, mortality rates from stomach cancer in Peru declined by 16%. The highlands had the highest mortality rates as compared to those from the coast or rainforest region. These geographical differences in mortality could reflect a different distribution in stomach cancer risk factors as the prevalence of H. pylori, poor dietary habits, low socioeconomic background of the Andean population and the lack of a decentralized health system.

Trends and geographic pattern of stomach cancer mortality in Peru / E.F. Ruiz, J.S. Torres-Roman, S.A. Servan, J.F. Martinez-Herrera, M.A. Arce-Huamani, G. Carioli, C. La Vecchia. - In: CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY. - ISSN 1877-7821. - 58(2019 Feb), pp. 193-198. [10.1016/j.canep.2018.10.018]

Trends and geographic pattern of stomach cancer mortality in Peru

G. Carioli;C. La Vecchia
2019-02

Abstract

Background: Stomach cancer mortality rates in South America are among the highest in the world. In Peru, stomach cancer has the highest absolute number of cancer deaths in both sexes combined. We estimated mortality rates for stomach cancer in Peru by sex and geographical region between 2008 and 2015. Methods: We obtained death data for stomach cancer from the Peruvian Ministry of Health database. We estimated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) per 100,000 persons using the direct method and the world standard population. Results: A total of 25,020 deaths from stomach cancer were identified in the study period. At national level, stomach cancer mortality rates (per 100,000 population) for men ranged from 9.8 in 2008 to 8.8 in 2015 with a percent change of - 16%, and for women from 8.8 in 2008 to 7.7 in 2015 with a percent change of -16.8%. The highlands had the highest mortality rates overall, mainly in Huancavelica and Huanuco. The rainforest had the lowest rates and the highest decline in stomach cancer ASMRs. The coast displayed intermediate rates overall. Conclusions: Within the study period, mortality rates from stomach cancer in Peru declined by 16%. The highlands had the highest mortality rates as compared to those from the coast or rainforest region. These geographical differences in mortality could reflect a different distribution in stomach cancer risk factors as the prevalence of H. pylori, poor dietary habits, low socioeconomic background of the Andean population and the lack of a decentralized health system.
Mortality; Stomach neoplasm; Peru
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
3-dic-2018
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/611994
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