Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis and the leading cause of cancer death among women in the world, and differences across populations indicate a role of hormonal, reproductive and lifestyle factors. This study is based on a cohort of 78,050 women invited to undergo a mammogram by Local Health Authority of Milan, between 2003 and 2007. We carried out a nested case–control study including all the 3303 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed up to 2015, and 9909 controls matched by age and year of enrollment. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression models. The ORs were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.78–0.98) for an age at menarche ≥14 years and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.07–1.81) for an age of 30 years or older at first pregnancy. Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with breast cancer risk in women older than 50 years (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.54–2.31, for BMI≥30 vs. <20), while the association tended to be inverse in younger women. A high mammographic density increased breast cancer risk (OR = 2.61, 95% CI: 2.02–3.38 for density >75% vs. adipose tissue). The ORs were 1.67 (95% CI: 1.47–1.89) and 2.04 (95% CI: 1.38–3.00) for one first‐degree relative and two or more relatives affected by breast cancer, respectively. Our study confirms the role of major recognized risk factors for breast cancer in our population and provides the basis for a stratification of the participants in the mammographic screening according to different levels of risk

Risk factors for breast cancer in a cohort of mammographic screening program : a nested case-control study within the FRiCaM study / F. Bravi, A. Decarli, A.G. Russo. - In: CANCER MEDICINE. - ISSN 2045-7634. - 7:5(2018 May), pp. 2145-2152.

Risk factors for breast cancer in a cohort of mammographic screening program : a nested case-control study within the FRiCaM study

F. Bravi
;
A. Decarli;
2018

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis and the leading cause of cancer death among women in the world, and differences across populations indicate a role of hormonal, reproductive and lifestyle factors. This study is based on a cohort of 78,050 women invited to undergo a mammogram by Local Health Authority of Milan, between 2003 and 2007. We carried out a nested case–control study including all the 3303 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed up to 2015, and 9909 controls matched by age and year of enrollment. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression models. The ORs were 0.88 (95% CI: 0.78–0.98) for an age at menarche ≥14 years and 1.39 (95% CI: 1.07–1.81) for an age of 30 years or older at first pregnancy. Body mass index (BMI) was positively associated with breast cancer risk in women older than 50 years (OR = 1.89, 95% CI: 1.54–2.31, for BMI≥30 vs. <20), while the association tended to be inverse in younger women. A high mammographic density increased breast cancer risk (OR = 2.61, 95% CI: 2.02–3.38 for density >75% vs. adipose tissue). The ORs were 1.67 (95% CI: 1.47–1.89) and 2.04 (95% CI: 1.38–3.00) for one first‐degree relative and two or more relatives affected by breast cancer, respectively. Our study confirms the role of major recognized risk factors for breast cancer in our population and provides the basis for a stratification of the participants in the mammographic screening according to different levels of risk
breast cancer; cohort; nested case–control study; prevention; risk factors
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/609645
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