Background: Parenteral Nutrition (PN) is prescribed to children with intestinal failure. Although life saving, complications are common. Recommendations for indications and constituents of PN are made in the 2005 guidelines by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). The aim of this study was to establish if the indications for prescribing PN in a tertiary children's hospital were appropriate, and to identify complications encountered. Data were compared to those published by the National Confidential Enquiry into patient outcome and death (NCEPOD) carried out in the United Kingdom in 2010. Methods: Children and newborns receiving inpatient PN over a 6 months period were entered into the study and data was collected prospectively. The appropriate indications for the use of PN were based on the ESPGHAN guidelines. Recorded complications were divided into metabolic, central venous catheter (CVC) related, hepatobiliary and nutritional. Results: A total of 303 children (67 newborns) were entered into the study. The main indications for the start of PN were critical illness (66/303), surgery (63/303) and bone marrow transplantation (28/303). The ESPGHAN recommendations were followed in 91.7% (278/303) of cases (95.5% of newborns, 90.7% of children). PN was considered inappropriate in 12/303 patients and equivocal in 13. The mean PN duration was 18 days (1-160) and the incidence of complications correlated to the length of PN prescribed. Metabolic, hepatobiliary and CVC related complications affected 74.6, 24.4, 16.4% of newborns and 76.7, 37.7 and 24.6% of children respectively. In relation to the appropriate indications for the start of PN our results mirrored those reported by the NCEPOD audit (92.4% of newborns and 88.6% children). However, the incidence of metabolic disturbances was higher in our cohort (74.6% vs 30.4% in children, 76.7% vs 14.3% in newborns) but CVC related complications lower amongst our newborns (16,4% vs 25%). Conclusions: Although the indications for inpatient PN in children is mostly justified, there is still a proportion who is receiving PN unnecessarily. PN related complications remain common. There is a need for better education amongst health professionals prescribing PN and access to nutritional support teams to reduce unwanted side effects.

Indications and complications of inpatient parenteral nutrition prescribed to children in a large tertiary referral hospital / C. Mantegazza, N. Landy, G.V. Zuccotti, J. Köglmeier. - In: THE ITALIAN JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS. - ISSN 1824-7288. - 44(2018 Jun 08), pp. 66.1-66.12. [10.1186/s13052-018-0505-x]

Indications and complications of inpatient parenteral nutrition prescribed to children in a large tertiary referral hospital

C. Mantegazza
;
G.V. Zuccotti
Penultimo
;
2018-06-08

Abstract

Background: Parenteral Nutrition (PN) is prescribed to children with intestinal failure. Although life saving, complications are common. Recommendations for indications and constituents of PN are made in the 2005 guidelines by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN). The aim of this study was to establish if the indications for prescribing PN in a tertiary children's hospital were appropriate, and to identify complications encountered. Data were compared to those published by the National Confidential Enquiry into patient outcome and death (NCEPOD) carried out in the United Kingdom in 2010. Methods: Children and newborns receiving inpatient PN over a 6 months period were entered into the study and data was collected prospectively. The appropriate indications for the use of PN were based on the ESPGHAN guidelines. Recorded complications were divided into metabolic, central venous catheter (CVC) related, hepatobiliary and nutritional. Results: A total of 303 children (67 newborns) were entered into the study. The main indications for the start of PN were critical illness (66/303), surgery (63/303) and bone marrow transplantation (28/303). The ESPGHAN recommendations were followed in 91.7% (278/303) of cases (95.5% of newborns, 90.7% of children). PN was considered inappropriate in 12/303 patients and equivocal in 13. The mean PN duration was 18 days (1-160) and the incidence of complications correlated to the length of PN prescribed. Metabolic, hepatobiliary and CVC related complications affected 74.6, 24.4, 16.4% of newborns and 76.7, 37.7 and 24.6% of children respectively. In relation to the appropriate indications for the start of PN our results mirrored those reported by the NCEPOD audit (92.4% of newborns and 88.6% children). However, the incidence of metabolic disturbances was higher in our cohort (74.6% vs 30.4% in children, 76.7% vs 14.3% in newborns) but CVC related complications lower amongst our newborns (16,4% vs 25%). Conclusions: Although the indications for inpatient PN in children is mostly justified, there is still a proportion who is receiving PN unnecessarily. PN related complications remain common. There is a need for better education amongst health professionals prescribing PN and access to nutritional support teams to reduce unwanted side effects.
ESPGHAN guidelines; NCEPOD; Pediatric parenteral nutrition; appropriatness; complications; indications
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/597803
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