The number and complexity of endovascular procedures performed via either arterial or venous access are steadily increasing. Albeit associated with higher morbidity compared to the radial approach, the traditional common femoral artery remains the preferred access site in a variety of cardiac, aortic, oncologic and peripheral vascular procedures. Both transarterial and venous cannulation (for electrophysiology, intravenous laser ablation and central catheterisation) at the groin may result in potentially severe vascular access site complications (VASC). Furthermore, vascular and soft-tissue groin infections may develop after untreated VASC or secondarily to non-sterile injections for recreational drug use. VASC and groin infections require rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment to avoid further, potentially devastating harm. Whereas in the past colour Doppler ultrasound was generally used, in recent years cardiologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists increasingly rely on pelvic and femoral CT angiography. Despite drawbacks of ionising radiation and the need for intravenous contrast, multidetector CT rapidly and consistently provides a panoramic, comprehensive visualisation, which is crucial for correct choice between conservative, endovascular and surgical management. This paper aims to provide radiologists with an increased familiarity with iatrogenic and self-inflicted VASC and infections at the groin by presenting examples of haematomas, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, arterial occlusion, arterio-venous fistula, endovenous heat-induced thrombosis, septic thrombophlebitis, soft-tissue infections at the groin, and late sequelae of venous injuries.

Multidetector CT of iatrogenic and self-inflicted vascular lesions and infections at the groin / M. Tonolini, A.M. Ierardi, G. Carrafiello, D. Laganà. - In: INSIGHTS INTO IMAGING. - ISSN 1869-4101. - 9:4(2018 Aug), pp. 631-642. [10.1007/s13244-018-0613-6]

Multidetector CT of iatrogenic and self-inflicted vascular lesions and infections at the groin

G. Carrafiello;
2018-08

Abstract

The number and complexity of endovascular procedures performed via either arterial or venous access are steadily increasing. Albeit associated with higher morbidity compared to the radial approach, the traditional common femoral artery remains the preferred access site in a variety of cardiac, aortic, oncologic and peripheral vascular procedures. Both transarterial and venous cannulation (for electrophysiology, intravenous laser ablation and central catheterisation) at the groin may result in potentially severe vascular access site complications (VASC). Furthermore, vascular and soft-tissue groin infections may develop after untreated VASC or secondarily to non-sterile injections for recreational drug use. VASC and groin infections require rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatment to avoid further, potentially devastating harm. Whereas in the past colour Doppler ultrasound was generally used, in recent years cardiologists, vascular surgeons and interventional radiologists increasingly rely on pelvic and femoral CT angiography. Despite drawbacks of ionising radiation and the need for intravenous contrast, multidetector CT rapidly and consistently provides a panoramic, comprehensive visualisation, which is crucial for correct choice between conservative, endovascular and surgical management. This paper aims to provide radiologists with an increased familiarity with iatrogenic and self-inflicted VASC and infections at the groin by presenting examples of haematomas, active bleeding, pseudoaneurysms, arterial occlusion, arterio-venous fistula, endovenous heat-induced thrombosis, septic thrombophlebitis, soft-tissue infections at the groin, and late sequelae of venous injuries.
Complications; Computed Tomography (CT); Femoral artery; Pseudoaneurysm; Vascular access
Settore MED/36 - Diagnostica per Immagini e Radioterapia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/590387
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