In the past two centuries, breeding practices led to more than 400 modern dog breeds showing high genetic drift, small population size without admixing events, increased between-breeds differentiation and inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression and reduced population sizes are major drawbacks of human-driven selection in the dog species. Therefore, increasing the breed genetic basis is extremely important for their welfare and biodiversity. The availability of efficient and affordable genomic techniques such as dense SNPs arrays, together with the effort of the scientific community, allowed the production of massive genomic data of purebred dogs (Parker et al., 2017; Talenti et al., 2018). However, the 75% of the 1 billion living dogs are free-ranging and breeding (Pilot et al., 2015), with largely unknown ancestry. Genomic tools could be useful in this, in improving welfare and possibly enlarging the genetic basis of small dog populations. In this study, we evaluate a combined approach to assign the ancestors of different admixed and purebred dogs, sampled by saliva swab following European rules and genotyped by the 230K SNP chip. We compared three admixed individuals with 183 breeds and populations, including wild canids and wolves from Talenti et al., 2018. A combination of ranked supervised admixture and haplotype sharing (Beagle 4; Browning & Browning, 2013), allowed us to guess the most likely populations of three different admixed dogs. Results diverged in the three cases. We confirmed the supposed ancestry of one dog, partially confirmed the second dog and defined the third dog as a true mongrel, with 5 different breeds found as top ancestry scores comparable in size and morphology. These results suggest usefulness of genomic metrics in define the make-up even for admixed dogs. The genomic era in this species reached the maturity and this information deserves to be included for a better management of single dog and breeds facing for example health and longevity challenges.

Beyond pedigree and towards applied genomics / A. Talenti, S. Frattini, M. Cortellari, P. Crepaldi. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH, ANIMAL SCIENCE & FOOD SAFETY. - ISSN 2283-3927. - 5:2S(2018 Jun 18), pp. 17-18. ((Intervento presentato al convegno Canine genomics and veterinary: from domestication to pathologies : June, 18th tenutosi a Milano nel 2018.

Beyond pedigree and towards applied genomics

A. Talenti
Primo
;
S. Frattini
Secondo
;
M. Cortellari
Penultimo
;
P. Crepaldi
Ultimo
2018-06-18

Abstract

In the past two centuries, breeding practices led to more than 400 modern dog breeds showing high genetic drift, small population size without admixing events, increased between-breeds differentiation and inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression and reduced population sizes are major drawbacks of human-driven selection in the dog species. Therefore, increasing the breed genetic basis is extremely important for their welfare and biodiversity. The availability of efficient and affordable genomic techniques such as dense SNPs arrays, together with the effort of the scientific community, allowed the production of massive genomic data of purebred dogs (Parker et al., 2017; Talenti et al., 2018). However, the 75% of the 1 billion living dogs are free-ranging and breeding (Pilot et al., 2015), with largely unknown ancestry. Genomic tools could be useful in this, in improving welfare and possibly enlarging the genetic basis of small dog populations. In this study, we evaluate a combined approach to assign the ancestors of different admixed and purebred dogs, sampled by saliva swab following European rules and genotyped by the 230K SNP chip. We compared three admixed individuals with 183 breeds and populations, including wild canids and wolves from Talenti et al., 2018. A combination of ranked supervised admixture and haplotype sharing (Beagle 4; Browning & Browning, 2013), allowed us to guess the most likely populations of three different admixed dogs. Results diverged in the three cases. We confirmed the supposed ancestry of one dog, partially confirmed the second dog and defined the third dog as a true mongrel, with 5 different breeds found as top ancestry scores comparable in size and morphology. These results suggest usefulness of genomic metrics in define the make-up even for admixed dogs. The genomic era in this species reached the maturity and this information deserves to be included for a better management of single dog and breeds facing for example health and longevity challenges.
dogs; inbreeding; genomic metric; mongrel;
Settore AGR/17 - Zootecnica Generale e Miglioramento Genetico
https://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/haf/issue/viewIssue/1265/202
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Crepaldi_HAF_CGV2018_2.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 438.83 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
438.83 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/580067
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact