Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) PET scans were used to study the physiological bases of lipreading, a natural skill of extracting language from mouth movements, which contributes to speech perception in everyday life. Viewing connected mouth movements that could not be lexically identified and that evoke perception of isolated speech sounds (nonlexical lipreading) was associated with bilateral activation of the auditory association cortex around Wernicke’s area, of left dorsal premotor cortex, and left opercular-premotor division of the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area). The supplementary motor area was active as well. These areas have all been implicated in phonological processing, speech and mouth motor planning, and execution. In addition, nonlexical lipreading also differentially activated visual motion areas. Lexical access through lipreading was associated with a similar pattern of activation and with additional foci in ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally and in left inferior parietal cortex. Linear regression analysis of cerebral blood flow and proficiency for lexical lipreading further clarified the role of these areas in gaining access to language through lipreading. The results suggest cortical activation circuits for lipreading from action representations that may differentiate lexical access from nonlexical processes.

A functional-anatomical model for lip-reading / E. Paulesu, D. Perani, V. Blasi, G. Silani, N.A. Borghese, U. De Giovanni, S. Sensolo, F. Fazio. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3077. - 90:3(2003 Sep), pp. 2005-2013.

A functional-anatomical model for lip-reading

N.A. Borghese;
2003

Abstract

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) PET scans were used to study the physiological bases of lipreading, a natural skill of extracting language from mouth movements, which contributes to speech perception in everyday life. Viewing connected mouth movements that could not be lexically identified and that evoke perception of isolated speech sounds (nonlexical lipreading) was associated with bilateral activation of the auditory association cortex around Wernicke’s area, of left dorsal premotor cortex, and left opercular-premotor division of the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s area). The supplementary motor area was active as well. These areas have all been implicated in phonological processing, speech and mouth motor planning, and execution. In addition, nonlexical lipreading also differentially activated visual motion areas. Lexical access through lipreading was associated with a similar pattern of activation and with additional foci in ventral- and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex bilaterally and in left inferior parietal cortex. Linear regression analysis of cerebral blood flow and proficiency for lexical lipreading further clarified the role of these areas in gaining access to language through lipreading. The results suggest cortical activation circuits for lipreading from action representations that may differentiate lexical access from nonlexical processes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/57601
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