Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) are commonly described as unconscious muscular activities aimed to counterbalance the perturbation caused by the primary movement, so as to ensure the whole-body balance. These activities usually create fixation chains spreading over several muscles of different limbs, and may be thus called inter-limb APAs. However, APAs also precede voluntary movements involving tiny masses, like flexion/extension of the wrist or index-finger. Such movements are preceded by an intra-limb APA chain, that involves muscles acting on the proximal joints. Considering the small mass of the moving segments, it is unlikely that the ensuing perturbation could threaten the whole-body balance. So, it is interesting to enquire the physiological role of intra-limb APAs and their organization and control compared to inter-limb APAs. Since several years, our research has been focused on intra-limb APAs and highlighted a strict correspondence in their behaviour and temporal/spatial organization with respect to inter-limb APAs. Hence we suggested that both are manifestations of the same phenomenon. Moreover, by exploiting the relatively simple biomechanics of the intra-limb APAs that precede index-finger flexion, we collected evidence supporting that APAs and prime mover activation are driven by a shared motor command, and also that by granting a proper fixation of those body segments proximal to the moving one, APAs are involved in refining movement precision.

The intra-limb anticipatory postural adjustments and their role in movement performance / R. Esposti, F. Bolzoni, C. Bruttini, P. Cavallari - In: 68th SIF National Congress - Programme & Abstracts[s.l] : Società Italiana di Fisiologia, 2017 Sep. - ISBN 9788894010572. - pp. 101-101 (( Intervento presentato al 68. convegno SIF National Congress tenutosi a Pavia nel 2017.

The intra-limb anticipatory postural adjustments and their role in movement performance

R. Esposti
;
F. Bolzoni
Secondo
;
C. Bruttini
Penultimo
;
P. Cavallari
Ultimo
2017-09

Abstract

Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) are commonly described as unconscious muscular activities aimed to counterbalance the perturbation caused by the primary movement, so as to ensure the whole-body balance. These activities usually create fixation chains spreading over several muscles of different limbs, and may be thus called inter-limb APAs. However, APAs also precede voluntary movements involving tiny masses, like flexion/extension of the wrist or index-finger. Such movements are preceded by an intra-limb APA chain, that involves muscles acting on the proximal joints. Considering the small mass of the moving segments, it is unlikely that the ensuing perturbation could threaten the whole-body balance. So, it is interesting to enquire the physiological role of intra-limb APAs and their organization and control compared to inter-limb APAs. Since several years, our research has been focused on intra-limb APAs and highlighted a strict correspondence in their behaviour and temporal/spatial organization with respect to inter-limb APAs. Hence we suggested that both are manifestations of the same phenomenon. Moreover, by exploiting the relatively simple biomechanics of the intra-limb APAs that precede index-finger flexion, we collected evidence supporting that APAs and prime mover activation are driven by a shared motor command, and also that by granting a proper fixation of those body segments proximal to the moving one, APAs are involved in refining movement precision.
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Società Italiana di Fisiologia
Book Part (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/523501
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