Introduction In the last decades, tennis serve has become one of the most important shots of tennis game, allowing players to gain points with no or very short rallies. In fact, as shown by ATP data, in 2015 51 players obtained more than 70% of points during the first serve. This study aims at investigating the possible relationships between anthropometric and functional parameters and maximal serve speed in professional tennis players. Methods Eight professional male tennis players (age 23±4 [mean±SD] years-old; height 181±4 cm; body mass 80±4 kg; playing experience 14±4 years; training practice29±6 hours/week) were recruited. Anthropometric parameters, squat jump, counter movement jump, counter movement jump free (4-Jump, Kistler Instruments, SWI), handgrip strength (Irvington, NY, USA), string tension and first and second maximal serve speed (Stalker Radar, Texas, USA) were assessed. Height jump during first and second serve (Optojump Next, Italy) was also evaluated. Results Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed significant (p<0.05) positive relationships between height and ball speed in both the first (R=0.78; p=0.02) and second (R=0.80; p=0.017) serve. Significant negative correlation between negative correlation between serve speed and arm muscle area in the first serve only (R= -0.78; p=0.03) was found. Moreover, slightly significant correlation between jump height and first (R=0.71; p=0.049) and second (R=0.71; p=0.047) serve speed was computed. In addition, a trend towards a positive correlation was observed between string tension and serves for both first and second serve (R=0.54; p=0.16; R=0.60; p=0.11). No significant relationship was found between serve speed and the other variables considered. Discussion A proficient serve is a crucial part of tennis players’ stroke repertoire and it can be used to gain an advantage at the start of each point. Height was confirmed to be the main anthropometric determinant of serves speed in professional players and it could be a prerequisite for success in this sport. Moreover, reaching higher impact point with a vertical contribution of the lower limbs could improve the chance to realize a fast serve. However, tennis players must to take in account that trying to develop higher vertical forces for improve jump height during first and second serve could be counterproductive because serve technique requires the coordination of both lower and upper limbs. References Kovacs M, Ellembecker T. (2011). Sports Health, 3:504-13. Girard O, Micallef JP, Millet GP. (2003). Med Sci Sports Exerc, 37:1021-9.

Relationships between anthropometric or functional characterisitics and maximal serve velocity in professional tennis players / M. Bonato, C. Rossi, G. Merati, A. La Torre - In: European College of Sport Science : Book of Abstracts[s.l] : SporTools GmbH – Data management in sports, 2017 Jul. - ISBN 9783981841404. - pp. 104-104 (( Intervento presentato al 22. convegno European college of sport science tenutosi a MetropolisRuhr nel 2017.

Relationships between anthropometric or functional characterisitics and maximal serve velocity in professional tennis players

M. Bonato;C. Rossi;G. Merati;A. La Torre
2017-07

Abstract

Introduction In the last decades, tennis serve has become one of the most important shots of tennis game, allowing players to gain points with no or very short rallies. In fact, as shown by ATP data, in 2015 51 players obtained more than 70% of points during the first serve. This study aims at investigating the possible relationships between anthropometric and functional parameters and maximal serve speed in professional tennis players. Methods Eight professional male tennis players (age 23±4 [mean±SD] years-old; height 181±4 cm; body mass 80±4 kg; playing experience 14±4 years; training practice29±6 hours/week) were recruited. Anthropometric parameters, squat jump, counter movement jump, counter movement jump free (4-Jump, Kistler Instruments, SWI), handgrip strength (Irvington, NY, USA), string tension and first and second maximal serve speed (Stalker Radar, Texas, USA) were assessed. Height jump during first and second serve (Optojump Next, Italy) was also evaluated. Results Pearson’s correlation coefficient showed significant (p<0.05) positive relationships between height and ball speed in both the first (R=0.78; p=0.02) and second (R=0.80; p=0.017) serve. Significant negative correlation between negative correlation between serve speed and arm muscle area in the first serve only (R= -0.78; p=0.03) was found. Moreover, slightly significant correlation between jump height and first (R=0.71; p=0.049) and second (R=0.71; p=0.047) serve speed was computed. In addition, a trend towards a positive correlation was observed between string tension and serves for both first and second serve (R=0.54; p=0.16; R=0.60; p=0.11). No significant relationship was found between serve speed and the other variables considered. Discussion A proficient serve is a crucial part of tennis players’ stroke repertoire and it can be used to gain an advantage at the start of each point. Height was confirmed to be the main anthropometric determinant of serves speed in professional players and it could be a prerequisite for success in this sport. Moreover, reaching higher impact point with a vertical contribution of the lower limbs could improve the chance to realize a fast serve. However, tennis players must to take in account that trying to develop higher vertical forces for improve jump height during first and second serve could be counterproductive because serve technique requires the coordination of both lower and upper limbs. References Kovacs M, Ellembecker T. (2011). Sports Health, 3:504-13. Girard O, Micallef JP, Millet GP. (2003). Med Sci Sports Exerc, 37:1021-9.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/516340
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