Background: Genomic selection estimates genetic merit based on dense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotypes and phenotypes. This requires that SNPs explain a large fraction of the genetic variance. The objectives of this work were: (1) to estimate the fraction of genetic variance explained by dense genome-wide markers using 54 K SNP chip genotyping, and (2) to evaluate the effect of alternative marker-based relationship matrices and corrections for the base population on the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers. Methods. Two alternative marker-based relationship matrices were estimated using 35 706 SNPs on 1086 dairy bulls. Both pedigree- and marker-based relationship matrices were fitted simultaneously or separately in an animal model to estimate the fraction of variance not explained by the markers, i.e. the fraction explained by the pedigree. The phenotypes considered in the analysis were the deregressed estimated breeding values (dEBV) for milk, fat and protein yield and for somatic cell score (SCS). Results: When dEBV were not sufficiently accurate (50 or 70%), the estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers was around 65% for yield traits and 45% for SCS. Scaling marker genotypes with locus-specific frequencies of heterozygotes slightly increased the variance explained by markers, compared with scaling with the average frequency of heterozygotes across loci. The estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers using separately both relationships matrices followed the same trends but the results were underestimated. With less accurate dEBV estimates, the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers was underestimated, which is probably an artifact due to the dEBV being estimated by a pedigree-based animal model. Conclusions: When using only highly accurate dEBV, the proportion of the genetic variance explained by the Illumina 54 K SNP chip was approximately 80% for Brown Swiss cattle. These results depend on the SNP chip used and the family structure of the population, i.e. more dense SNPs and closer family relationships are expected to result in a higher fraction of the variance explained by the SNPs.

Estimates of missing heritability for complex traits in Brown Swiss cattle / S. Román-Ponce, A.B. Samoré, M.A. Dolezal, A. Bagnato, T.H.E. Meuwissen. - In: GENETICS SELECTION EVOLUTION. - ISSN 0999-193X. - 46:1(2014 Jun), pp. 36.1-36.7.

Estimates of missing heritability for complex traits in Brown Swiss cattle

S. Román-Ponce
Primo
;
A.B. Samoré
Secondo
;
M.A. Dolezal;A. Bagnato
Penultimo
;
2014-06

Abstract

Background: Genomic selection estimates genetic merit based on dense SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) genotypes and phenotypes. This requires that SNPs explain a large fraction of the genetic variance. The objectives of this work were: (1) to estimate the fraction of genetic variance explained by dense genome-wide markers using 54 K SNP chip genotyping, and (2) to evaluate the effect of alternative marker-based relationship matrices and corrections for the base population on the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers. Methods. Two alternative marker-based relationship matrices were estimated using 35 706 SNPs on 1086 dairy bulls. Both pedigree- and marker-based relationship matrices were fitted simultaneously or separately in an animal model to estimate the fraction of variance not explained by the markers, i.e. the fraction explained by the pedigree. The phenotypes considered in the analysis were the deregressed estimated breeding values (dEBV) for milk, fat and protein yield and for somatic cell score (SCS). Results: When dEBV were not sufficiently accurate (50 or 70%), the estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers was around 65% for yield traits and 45% for SCS. Scaling marker genotypes with locus-specific frequencies of heterozygotes slightly increased the variance explained by markers, compared with scaling with the average frequency of heterozygotes across loci. The estimated fraction of the genetic variance explained by the markers using separately both relationships matrices followed the same trends but the results were underestimated. With less accurate dEBV estimates, the fraction of the genetic variance explained by markers was underestimated, which is probably an artifact due to the dEBV being estimated by a pedigree-based animal model. Conclusions: When using only highly accurate dEBV, the proportion of the genetic variance explained by the Illumina 54 K SNP chip was approximately 80% for Brown Swiss cattle. These results depend on the SNP chip used and the family structure of the population, i.e. more dense SNPs and closer family relationships are expected to result in a higher fraction of the variance explained by the SNPs.
Alleles; Animals; Breeding; Cattle; Gene Frequency; Genetic Markers; Genomics; Genotype; Male; Models, Genetic; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis; Pedigree; Phenotype; Quantitative Trait Loci; Quantitative Trait, Heritable; Genetic Variation; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Animal Science and Zoology; Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics; Genetics
Settore AGR/17 - Zootecnica Generale e Miglioramento Genetico
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/512843
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