The relationship between the consumption of salt and the risk of gastrointestinal cancer was examined using data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy. The study was conducted on 526 incident cases of gastric cancer, 621 of colon cancers, 382 of rectal cancers, and 1,223 controls admitted to hospital for acute, nonneoplastic, nondigestive tract disorders. Compared with those for people with low salt intakes, the relative risks (and 95% confidence intervals) for those with intermediate and high salt intakes were 1.3 (1.0-1.8) and 1.2 (0.8-1.7) for stomach, 1.0 (0.8-L3) and 1.1 (0.8-L5) for colon, and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) and 0.9 (0.6-1.3) for rectum. None of the trends in risk were statistically significant, and the risk estimates were not materially modified by allowance for major identified potential confounding factors. Thus, this study gives little support to the existence of any strong association between salt intake and gastrointestinal cancers. However, in view of the results obtained and of the uncertainties of salt intake measurement, the possibility exists of a real, although moderate, association of salt intake with gastric cancer. © 1990, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

Salt Preference and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancers / S. Franceschi, C.V.B. La Vecchia, B. D'Avanzo, A. Gentile. - In: NUTRITION AND CANCER. - ISSN 0163-5581. - 14:3-4(1990), pp. 227-232.

Salt Preference and the Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancers

C.V.B. La Vecchia;A. Gentile
Ultimo
1990

Abstract

The relationship between the consumption of salt and the risk of gastrointestinal cancer was examined using data from a case-control study conducted in northern Italy. The study was conducted on 526 incident cases of gastric cancer, 621 of colon cancers, 382 of rectal cancers, and 1,223 controls admitted to hospital for acute, nonneoplastic, nondigestive tract disorders. Compared with those for people with low salt intakes, the relative risks (and 95% confidence intervals) for those with intermediate and high salt intakes were 1.3 (1.0-1.8) and 1.2 (0.8-1.7) for stomach, 1.0 (0.8-L3) and 1.1 (0.8-L5) for colon, and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) and 0.9 (0.6-1.3) for rectum. None of the trends in risk were statistically significant, and the risk estimates were not materially modified by allowance for major identified potential confounding factors. Thus, this study gives little support to the existence of any strong association between salt intake and gastrointestinal cancers. However, in view of the results obtained and of the uncertainties of salt intake measurement, the possibility exists of a real, although moderate, association of salt intake with gastric cancer. © 1990, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.
Adult; Aged; Case-Control Studies; Female; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Humans; Italy; Male; Middle Aged; Risk Factors; Sodium, Dietary; Medicine (miscellaneous); Oncology; Nutrition and Dietetics; Cancer Research
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/503350
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