Introduction Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the most common bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and is associated with severe long-term sequelae in female populations. In Italy Ct infections are not submitted to a screening programme, and its epidemiological profile is understudied. Even scarcer information is available about the genetic diversity on ompA gene, whose sequence defines 18 different genovars. This study aims at evaluating the prevalence of Ct infection in young sexually active asymptomatic women aged 18-25, and characterizing the molecular epidemiology of the different circulating genovars in this population. Methods Cervical samples collected from 909 sexually-active-young women (mean age 21.5 years) were analyzed through molecular assay for the detection of Ct infection. Phylogenetic analysis on the ompA gene was performed on Ct positive samples to identify the circulating genovars. Results The overall prevalence of Ct-infection was 4.4% (95%CI: 3.2-5.9%): 5.3% among women aged 18-21 years and 3.5% among those aged 22-25 years. Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 different genovars: D, E, F, G, and H. The most common genovar was the E (46%), followed by genovar F and G (18.9% each), D (13.5%), and H (2.7%). Conclusions This study underlines the high prevalence of asymptomatic Ct-infections among young women. Overall, about half of asymptomatic infections is sustained by genovar E. The introduction in Italy of a systematic screening program should be considered to allow a better understanding of Ct spreading and providing women with an opportunity for early treatment to protect their sexual and reproductive health.

Molecular epidemiology and genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a cohort of young asymptomatic sexually active women (18-25 years) in Milan, Italy / S. Bianchi, E.R. Frati, M. Canuti, D. Colzani, E. Fasoli, A. Amendola, E. Tanzi. - In: JOURNAL OF PREVENTIVE MEDICINE AND HYGIENE. - ISSN 1121-2233. - 57:3(2016 Sep), pp. E128-E134.

Molecular epidemiology and genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis infection in a cohort of young asymptomatic sexually active women (18-25 years) in Milan, Italy

S. Bianchi
;
E.R. Frati
Secondo
;
M. Canuti;D. Colzani;A. Amendola
Penultimo
;
E. Tanzi
Ultimo
2016-09

Abstract

Introduction Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the most common bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and is associated with severe long-term sequelae in female populations. In Italy Ct infections are not submitted to a screening programme, and its epidemiological profile is understudied. Even scarcer information is available about the genetic diversity on ompA gene, whose sequence defines 18 different genovars. This study aims at evaluating the prevalence of Ct infection in young sexually active asymptomatic women aged 18-25, and characterizing the molecular epidemiology of the different circulating genovars in this population. Methods Cervical samples collected from 909 sexually-active-young women (mean age 21.5 years) were analyzed through molecular assay for the detection of Ct infection. Phylogenetic analysis on the ompA gene was performed on Ct positive samples to identify the circulating genovars. Results The overall prevalence of Ct-infection was 4.4% (95%CI: 3.2-5.9%): 5.3% among women aged 18-21 years and 3.5% among those aged 22-25 years. Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 different genovars: D, E, F, G, and H. The most common genovar was the E (46%), followed by genovar F and G (18.9% each), D (13.5%), and H (2.7%). Conclusions This study underlines the high prevalence of asymptomatic Ct-infections among young women. Overall, about half of asymptomatic infections is sustained by genovar E. The introduction in Italy of a systematic screening program should be considered to allow a better understanding of Ct spreading and providing women with an opportunity for early treatment to protect their sexual and reproductive health.
chlamydia trachomatis infection; sexually active asymptomatic young women;chlamydia genovar; molecular epidemiology; sexually transmitted diseases
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
Settore MED/07 - Microbiologia e Microbiologia Clinica
https://www.jpmh.org/index.php/jpmh/article/view/632/pdf_1
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Bianchi_JPMH2016.pdf

accesso aperto

Descrizione: Versione definitiva pubblicata
Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 190.87 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
190.87 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/502978
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 9
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact