In Cambodia the local indigenous cat is appreciated by many. They can share the flats in the capital city where they are treated as pets, or the rural houses of the county side villages where they are more functional. Practically they always originate from stray cats that have conquered humans with their gentle and social behavior. There are different narratives which substantiate a more or less ancient and noble origin, while based on anthropological observation they are key to some traditional customs and worshipping. They are characterized by several peculiar features which occur with variable frequencies in the observed subjects. Since 2011 an attempt was done to select some subjects and to breed them in order to have progenies who express all the desired characteristics. So far this breeding program has reached the third generation and the process for registering these population as a breed has started in Italy (Khmer cat). Investigations on the morphology of the tail and on its inheritance has been carried out. More than 5 fancy breeds are bred worldwide having in their standard the “short tail”: Manx, Japanese Bobtail, Kurilian Bobtail, American Bobtail and Pixie Bob. In order to characterize the Khmer, a three generations familiar group (seven ancestors) of 73 Khmer cats segregating bob tails and other tails “abnormalities” was reconstructed. Nor litter size nor occurrences of abortions, newborn defects or deaths were available or reported, therefore a lethal effect linked to the character was not assessable. The cats were categorized by palpation and XRay analysis of the backbone and tail. As reported in Japanese bobtail, the transmission of the character “short tail” was consistent with a dominant inheritance with variable expression, ranging from anural through short-pompom and short-strait tail. Genetic and/or not genetic modifier factors were strongly suspected. Genetic profiling was performed for parentage control. XRay showed tail abnormalities. Out of the familiar group a large subset of cats were analyzed to genotype the known causative mutations of the feline bob tail. The data available so far exclude that Khmer share the same mutations described in Manx cat.

Around the tail of the Khmer Cat / A. Cristalli, S. Marelli, P. Valiati, F. Genova, M. Longeri - In: Proceedings of the 35th International Conference on Animal Genetics[s.l] : ISAG, 2016 Jul. - pp. 96-97 (( Intervento presentato al 35. convegno ISAG tenutosi a Salt Lake City nel 2016.

Around the tail of the Khmer Cat

S. Marelli
Secondo
;
P. Valiati;F. Genova
Penultimo
;
M. Longeri
Ultimo
2016-07

Abstract

In Cambodia the local indigenous cat is appreciated by many. They can share the flats in the capital city where they are treated as pets, or the rural houses of the county side villages where they are more functional. Practically they always originate from stray cats that have conquered humans with their gentle and social behavior. There are different narratives which substantiate a more or less ancient and noble origin, while based on anthropological observation they are key to some traditional customs and worshipping. They are characterized by several peculiar features which occur with variable frequencies in the observed subjects. Since 2011 an attempt was done to select some subjects and to breed them in order to have progenies who express all the desired characteristics. So far this breeding program has reached the third generation and the process for registering these population as a breed has started in Italy (Khmer cat). Investigations on the morphology of the tail and on its inheritance has been carried out. More than 5 fancy breeds are bred worldwide having in their standard the “short tail”: Manx, Japanese Bobtail, Kurilian Bobtail, American Bobtail and Pixie Bob. In order to characterize the Khmer, a three generations familiar group (seven ancestors) of 73 Khmer cats segregating bob tails and other tails “abnormalities” was reconstructed. Nor litter size nor occurrences of abortions, newborn defects or deaths were available or reported, therefore a lethal effect linked to the character was not assessable. The cats were categorized by palpation and XRay analysis of the backbone and tail. As reported in Japanese bobtail, the transmission of the character “short tail” was consistent with a dominant inheritance with variable expression, ranging from anural through short-pompom and short-strait tail. Genetic and/or not genetic modifier factors were strongly suspected. Genetic profiling was performed for parentage control. XRay showed tail abnormalities. Out of the familiar group a large subset of cats were analyzed to genotype the known causative mutations of the feline bob tail. The data available so far exclude that Khmer share the same mutations described in Manx cat.
Felis catus; Khmer breed; bobtail
Settore AGR/17 - Zootecnica Generale e Miglioramento Genetico
International Society of Animal Genetics
Book Part (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
ISAG 2016_Khmer abstract.pdf

accesso riservato

Descrizione: Abstract
Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 956.66 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
956.66 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/480723
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact