Training can represent an important synchronizing factor that influence the circadian system. Exercise can be a strategy to mitigate the problems associated with transmeridian travel. Aim of this study is to verify if the adjustment of circadian rhythm induced by a training program, carried out before a transmeridian flight, can reduce the jet-lag symptmos. Eighteen volunteers (13 males + 5 females) flew from Milan to New York and back, in occasion of the New York City Marathon; 14 of them participated to the marathon. Individual training programs were planned for all of the 14 athletes. For a mounth before the flight, the athletes carried out their training divided: E (Evening), 9 athletes who carried out a training during the evening (19.00-21.00); M (Morning), 5 athletes who carried out a training during the morning (07.00-09.00). Training schedule: at least 3 times a week of 1 hour or more running training sessions (50-60% VO2max). Before the flight, the 2 groups trained for 5 consecutive days with the same intensity; in New York they all carried out the training in the morning. A third group, C (Control), was composed by 4 non-athletes who didn’t trained before the flight and didn’t partecipate to the marathon. Rest-activity monitorings were recorded by Actigraph for 3 days before the flight Milan-NewYork (PRE), for 24 hours during the first day in New York (NY1) and during the second day in New York (NY2). The data were analyzed using the actighraph software for the activity and sleep analysis. Activity analysis appraises the activity average score and the cosine peak. The analysis pointed out that activity levels in the M group are higher in New York than in Milan (PRE), while in the E group are lower. In the C group, activity levels don’t change in NY respect to Milan and are lower than in the M and E group. The before flight cosine peak values are statistically significant different between athletes training in the evening (h 16.19) and in the morning (h 12.07) in PRE data but not in NY1 and NY2. Sleep analysis, carried out to appraise Mouvement and Fragmentation Index (MFI), demonstrated statistically significant differences between groups M, E and C. In each group, the after flight MFI values were calculated as a percentage of the before flight MFI. In the C and M groups the MFI increases after the flight, while in the evening group the MFI decreases. In E group the evidence of decreased activity in New York, compared to PRE data, can be explained by the fact that the evening trained subjects had a better sleep quality respect to the morning trained athletes who showed an increased activity levels in NY. Further confirmation of this findings is done by MFI index: it confirms an objective better rest after a EW flight for the subjects that trained in the evening before the travel.

Training time and rest-activity analysis in New York City Marathon athletes / G. Calogiuri, A. Montaruli, E. Roveda, A. La Torre, F. Carandente - In: Book of abstracts of the 13. Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science / [a cura di] J. Cabri, F. Alves, D. Araujo, J. Barreiros, J. Diniz, A. Veloso. - [s.l] : null, 2008 Jul. - ISBN 978-972-735-156-5. - pp. 195-195 (( Intervento presentato al 13. convegno Annual Congress of the European College of Sport Science tenutosi a Estoril nel 2008.

Training time and rest-activity analysis in New York City Marathon athletes

G. Calogiuri
Primo
;
A. Montaruli
Secondo
;
E. Roveda;A. La Torre
Penultimo
;
F. Carandente
Ultimo
2008-07

Abstract

Training can represent an important synchronizing factor that influence the circadian system. Exercise can be a strategy to mitigate the problems associated with transmeridian travel. Aim of this study is to verify if the adjustment of circadian rhythm induced by a training program, carried out before a transmeridian flight, can reduce the jet-lag symptmos. Eighteen volunteers (13 males + 5 females) flew from Milan to New York and back, in occasion of the New York City Marathon; 14 of them participated to the marathon. Individual training programs were planned for all of the 14 athletes. For a mounth before the flight, the athletes carried out their training divided: E (Evening), 9 athletes who carried out a training during the evening (19.00-21.00); M (Morning), 5 athletes who carried out a training during the morning (07.00-09.00). Training schedule: at least 3 times a week of 1 hour or more running training sessions (50-60% VO2max). Before the flight, the 2 groups trained for 5 consecutive days with the same intensity; in New York they all carried out the training in the morning. A third group, C (Control), was composed by 4 non-athletes who didn’t trained before the flight and didn’t partecipate to the marathon. Rest-activity monitorings were recorded by Actigraph for 3 days before the flight Milan-NewYork (PRE), for 24 hours during the first day in New York (NY1) and during the second day in New York (NY2). The data were analyzed using the actighraph software for the activity and sleep analysis. Activity analysis appraises the activity average score and the cosine peak. The analysis pointed out that activity levels in the M group are higher in New York than in Milan (PRE), while in the E group are lower. In the C group, activity levels don’t change in NY respect to Milan and are lower than in the M and E group. The before flight cosine peak values are statistically significant different between athletes training in the evening (h 16.19) and in the morning (h 12.07) in PRE data but not in NY1 and NY2. Sleep analysis, carried out to appraise Mouvement and Fragmentation Index (MFI), demonstrated statistically significant differences between groups M, E and C. In each group, the after flight MFI values were calculated as a percentage of the before flight MFI. In the C and M groups the MFI increases after the flight, while in the evening group the MFI decreases. In E group the evidence of decreased activity in New York, compared to PRE data, can be explained by the fact that the evening trained subjects had a better sleep quality respect to the morning trained athletes who showed an increased activity levels in NY. Further confirmation of this findings is done by MFI index: it confirms an objective better rest after a EW flight for the subjects that trained in the evening before the travel.
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
Settore BIO/16 - Anatomia Umana
European College of Sport Science
http://www.ecss-congress.eu/images/stories/Companies/ESTBOAPrint.pdf
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/47061
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