This study is aimed at assessing time dedicated to, motivation and involvement in physical activity on behalf of pre-adolescents. 802 students (49.3% boys and 50.7% girls; mean age: 12.6) attending 43 classes of 11 Brianza's post-elementary schools. A questionnaire was prepared and administered to the involved sample. Classes took part in this study through randomized selection and data were analyzed using program Epi Info 6. Most of the respondents (60.1%) stay involved in sport because "it makes me feel good" and 32.4% because sport is "enjoyable and entertaining". Pre-adolescents chose the sport in which they become engaged on the basis of personal inclination (40%), in order to share experiences and their free time with friends (15.4%); 13.7% declare to prefer sport to be practiced in team. (13.7%). The most practiced sport are: football (51.3% boys, 4.5% girls), volley (3.9%-36.4%), dance (0.8%-25.2%) e swimming (9.4%-14%). 80.8% in the sample practice physical activity in settings outside schools and, among these, 51.7% dedicate three or more hours weekly to extra-school activities. There are significant differences (p < 0.05) between males' and females' engagement in physical activity (mean value: 4.1 hours; males: 4.6 h, females: 3.5 h). Among pre-teens, 18% declare to be physically inactive at all; 15.7% do not take part in sport activities because afraid to be bullied or shamed by peers. Research show that males are significantly more involved in physical activity than females.

I preadolescenti e lo sport : i risultati di un’indagine in alcune scuole medie dell’area brianzola / S. Schieppati, E. Rossetti, A. Piatti, L. Fonte, E. Pesenti, G. Zecca, M. Lattuada, A. Candela, F. Valagussa, A. Pellai. - In: ANNALI DI IGIENE MEDICINA PREVENTIVA E DI COMUNITÀ. - ISSN 1120-9135. - 18:6(2006), pp. 535-542.

I preadolescenti e lo sport : i risultati di un’indagine in alcune scuole medie dell’area brianzola

A. Pellai
Ultimo
2006

Abstract

This study is aimed at assessing time dedicated to, motivation and involvement in physical activity on behalf of pre-adolescents. 802 students (49.3% boys and 50.7% girls; mean age: 12.6) attending 43 classes of 11 Brianza's post-elementary schools. A questionnaire was prepared and administered to the involved sample. Classes took part in this study through randomized selection and data were analyzed using program Epi Info 6. Most of the respondents (60.1%) stay involved in sport because "it makes me feel good" and 32.4% because sport is "enjoyable and entertaining". Pre-adolescents chose the sport in which they become engaged on the basis of personal inclination (40%), in order to share experiences and their free time with friends (15.4%); 13.7% declare to prefer sport to be practiced in team. (13.7%). The most practiced sport are: football (51.3% boys, 4.5% girls), volley (3.9%-36.4%), dance (0.8%-25.2%) e swimming (9.4%-14%). 80.8% in the sample practice physical activity in settings outside schools and, among these, 51.7% dedicate three or more hours weekly to extra-school activities. There are significant differences (p < 0.05) between males' and females' engagement in physical activity (mean value: 4.1 hours; males: 4.6 h, females: 3.5 h). Among pre-teens, 18% declare to be physically inactive at all; 15.7% do not take part in sport activities because afraid to be bullied or shamed by peers. Research show that males are significantly more involved in physical activity than females.
adolescenza ; attività motoria
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
http://www.seu-roma.it/annali_igiene/apps/autos.php
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/45695
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