Background: Anaerobes are a relatively uncommon but important cause of bloodstream infection. However, their epidemiology has not been well defined in non-selected populations. We sought to describe the incidence of, risk factors for, and outcomes associated with anaerobic bacteremia. Methods: Population-based surveillance for bacteremia with anaerobic microorganisms was conducted in the Calgary area (population 1.2 million) during the period from 2000 to 2008. Results: A total of 904 incident cases were identified, for an overall population incidence of 8.7 per 100,000 per year; 231 (26 %) were nosocomial, 300 (33 %) were healthcare-associated community-onset, and 373 (41 %) were community-acquired. Elderly males were at the greatest risk. The most common pathogens identified were: Bacteroides fragilis group (3.6 per 100,000), Clostridium (non-perfringens) spp. (1.1 per 100,000), Peptostreptococcus spp. (0.9 per 100,000), and Clostridium perfringens (0.7 per 100,000). Non-susceptibility to metronidazole was 2 %, to clindamycin 17 %, and to penicillin 42 %. Relative to the general population, risk factors for anaerobic bloodstream infection included: male sex, increasing age, a prior diagnosis of cancer, chronic liver disease, heart disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and/or hemodialysis-dependent chronic renal failure (HDCRF). The 30-day mortality was 20 %. Increasing age, nosocomial acquisition, presence of malignancy, and several other co-morbid illnesses were independently associated with an increased risk of death. Conclusion: Anaerobic bloodstream infection is responsible for a significant burden of disease in general populations. The data herein establish the extent to which anaerobes contribute to morbidity and subsequent mortality. This information is key in developing preventative, empiric treatment and research priorities.

Comparison of presepsin (sCD14-ST) and procalcitonin for early prediction of outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock: preliminary findings from the Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis (ALBIOS) study / P. Caironi, S. Masson, E. Spanuth, R. Thomae, R. Fumagalli, A. Pesenti, M. Romero, G. Tognoni, R. Latini, L. Gattinoni. - In: INFECTION. - ISSN 0300-8126. - 41:suppl. 1(2013), pp. 108.41-108.41. ((Intervento presentato al 6. convegno International Congress ‘Sepsis and Multiorgan Dysfunction tenutosi a Weimar nel 2013.

Comparison of presepsin (sCD14-ST) and procalcitonin for early prediction of outcome in severe sepsis and septic shock: preliminary findings from the Albumin Italian Outcome Sepsis (ALBIOS) study

P. Caironi;A. Pesenti;L. Gattinoni
2013

Abstract

Background: Anaerobes are a relatively uncommon but important cause of bloodstream infection. However, their epidemiology has not been well defined in non-selected populations. We sought to describe the incidence of, risk factors for, and outcomes associated with anaerobic bacteremia. Methods: Population-based surveillance for bacteremia with anaerobic microorganisms was conducted in the Calgary area (population 1.2 million) during the period from 2000 to 2008. Results: A total of 904 incident cases were identified, for an overall population incidence of 8.7 per 100,000 per year; 231 (26 %) were nosocomial, 300 (33 %) were healthcare-associated community-onset, and 373 (41 %) were community-acquired. Elderly males were at the greatest risk. The most common pathogens identified were: Bacteroides fragilis group (3.6 per 100,000), Clostridium (non-perfringens) spp. (1.1 per 100,000), Peptostreptococcus spp. (0.9 per 100,000), and Clostridium perfringens (0.7 per 100,000). Non-susceptibility to metronidazole was 2 %, to clindamycin 17 %, and to penicillin 42 %. Relative to the general population, risk factors for anaerobic bloodstream infection included: male sex, increasing age, a prior diagnosis of cancer, chronic liver disease, heart disease, diabetes mellitus, stroke, inflammatory bowel disease, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and/or hemodialysis-dependent chronic renal failure (HDCRF). The 30-day mortality was 20 %. Increasing age, nosocomial acquisition, presence of malignancy, and several other co-morbid illnesses were independently associated with an increased risk of death. Conclusion: Anaerobic bloodstream infection is responsible for a significant burden of disease in general populations. The data herein establish the extent to which anaerobes contribute to morbidity and subsequent mortality. This information is key in developing preventative, empiric treatment and research priorities.
Sepsis; Soluble CD14; Critical Care; Infection; Procalcitonin
Settore MED/41 - Anestesiologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/254824
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