The main aim of the study was to examine the effects of transcranial polarization on neurons in two descending motor systems, rubro- and reticulospinal. Anodal DC current was applied through an electrode in contact with the skull over the contralateral sensori-motor cortex, against an electrode placed between the skull and the ipsilateral temporal muscles in deeply anaesthetized cats. Its effects were estimated from changes in descending volleys evoked by electrical stimuli applied in the red nucleus (RN), medial longitudinal fascicle (MLF; to reticulospinal fibres) and the pyramidal tract (PT; to corticospinal or corticoreticular fibres). The descending volleys were recorded from the surface of the spinal cord at a cervical level. Rubrospinal neurones were activated either directly or indirectly, via interpositorubral fibres. Reticulospinal neurons were likewise activated directly and indirectly, via other reticulospinal or corticospinal fibres. Transcranial polarization facilitated transsynaptic activation of both rubrospinal and reticulospinal neurons, shortening the latency of the indirect descending volleys and/or increasing them, Direct activation of descending axons was much less affected. The facilitation of all subcortical neurons examined was potentiated by repeated applications of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and outlasted the polarization by at least 1-2 h, replicating tDCS effects on indirect activation of cortical neurons. The results indicate that the beneficial effects of tDCS on motor performance in humans may be due to more efficient activation of not only cortical but also subcortical neuronal systems. Combined actions of tDCS on cortical and subcortical neurones might thus further improve recovery of motor functions during rehabilitation after central injuries.

Evidence for long-lasting subcortical facilitation by transcranial direct current stimulation in the cat / F. Bolzoni, L. Pettersson, E. Jankowska. - In: THE JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 0022-3751. - 591:13(2013 Jul 01), pp. 3381-3399. [10.1113/jphysiol.2012.244764]

Evidence for long-lasting subcortical facilitation by transcranial direct current stimulation in the cat

F. Bolzoni
Primo
;
2013

Abstract

The main aim of the study was to examine the effects of transcranial polarization on neurons in two descending motor systems, rubro- and reticulospinal. Anodal DC current was applied through an electrode in contact with the skull over the contralateral sensori-motor cortex, against an electrode placed between the skull and the ipsilateral temporal muscles in deeply anaesthetized cats. Its effects were estimated from changes in descending volleys evoked by electrical stimuli applied in the red nucleus (RN), medial longitudinal fascicle (MLF; to reticulospinal fibres) and the pyramidal tract (PT; to corticospinal or corticoreticular fibres). The descending volleys were recorded from the surface of the spinal cord at a cervical level. Rubrospinal neurones were activated either directly or indirectly, via interpositorubral fibres. Reticulospinal neurons were likewise activated directly and indirectly, via other reticulospinal or corticospinal fibres. Transcranial polarization facilitated transsynaptic activation of both rubrospinal and reticulospinal neurons, shortening the latency of the indirect descending volleys and/or increasing them, Direct activation of descending axons was much less affected. The facilitation of all subcortical neurons examined was potentiated by repeated applications of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and outlasted the polarization by at least 1-2 h, replicating tDCS effects on indirect activation of cortical neurons. The results indicate that the beneficial effects of tDCS on motor performance in humans may be due to more efficient activation of not only cortical but also subcortical neuronal systems. Combined actions of tDCS on cortical and subcortical neurones might thus further improve recovery of motor functions during rehabilitation after central injuries.
animals; brain; cats; electric stimulation; neurons; pyramidal tracts; transcranial magnetic stimulation
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
18-mar-2013
Article (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/253630
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