BACKGROUND: Despite the growing interest in the early-origins-of-later-disease hypothesis, little is known about the metabolic underpinnings linking infant weight gain and childhood obesity. OBJECTIVE: To discover biomarkers reflective of weight change in the first 6 months and overweight/obesity at age 6 years via a targeted metabolomics approach. DESIGN: This analysis comprised 726 infants from a European multicenter randomized trial (Childhood Obesity Programme, CHOP) for whom plasma blood samples at age 6 months and anthropometric data up to the age of 6 years were available. 'Rapid growth' was defined as a positive difference in weight within the first 6 months of life standardized to WHO growth standards. Weight change was regressed on each of 168 metabolites (acylcarnitines, lysophosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and amino acids). Metabolites significant after Bonferroni's correction were tested as predictors of later overweight/obesity. RESULTS: Among the overall 19 significant metabolites, 4 were associated with rapid growth and 15 were associated with a less-than-ideal weight change. After adjusting for feeding group, only the lysophosphatidylcholine LPCaC14:0 remained significantly associated with rapid weight gain (β = 0.18). Only LPCaC14:0 at age 6 months was predictive of overweight/obesity at age 6 years (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.04-1.69). CONCLUSION: LPCa14:0 is strongly related to rapid growth in infancy and childhood overweight/obesity. This suggests that LPCaC14:0 levels may represent a metabolically programmed effect of infant weight gain on the later obesity risk. However, these results require confirmation by independent cohorts.

Rapid growth and childhood obesity are strongly associated with lysoPC(14:0) / P. Rzehak, C. Hellmuth, O. Uhl, F.F. Kirchberg, W. Peissner, U. Harder, V. Grote, M. Weber, A. Xhonneux, J.P. Langhendries, N. Ferre, R. Closa-Monasterolo, E. Verduci, E. Riva, P. Socha, D. Gruszfeld, B. Koletzko. - In: ANNALS OF NUTRITION & METABOLISM. - ISSN 1421-9697. - 64:3-4(2014 Oct 02), pp. 294-303. [10.1159/000365037]

Rapid growth and childhood obesity are strongly associated with lysoPC(14:0)

E. Verduci;E. Riva;
2014

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite the growing interest in the early-origins-of-later-disease hypothesis, little is known about the metabolic underpinnings linking infant weight gain and childhood obesity. OBJECTIVE: To discover biomarkers reflective of weight change in the first 6 months and overweight/obesity at age 6 years via a targeted metabolomics approach. DESIGN: This analysis comprised 726 infants from a European multicenter randomized trial (Childhood Obesity Programme, CHOP) for whom plasma blood samples at age 6 months and anthropometric data up to the age of 6 years were available. 'Rapid growth' was defined as a positive difference in weight within the first 6 months of life standardized to WHO growth standards. Weight change was regressed on each of 168 metabolites (acylcarnitines, lysophosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and amino acids). Metabolites significant after Bonferroni's correction were tested as predictors of later overweight/obesity. RESULTS: Among the overall 19 significant metabolites, 4 were associated with rapid growth and 15 were associated with a less-than-ideal weight change. After adjusting for feeding group, only the lysophosphatidylcholine LPCaC14:0 remained significantly associated with rapid weight gain (β = 0.18). Only LPCaC14:0 at age 6 months was predictive of overweight/obesity at age 6 years (OR 1.33; 95% CI 1.04-1.69). CONCLUSION: LPCa14:0 is strongly related to rapid growth in infancy and childhood overweight/obesity. This suggests that LPCaC14:0 levels may represent a metabolically programmed effect of infant weight gain on the later obesity risk. However, these results require confirmation by independent cohorts.
Targeted metabolomics approach; Amino acid and lipid metabolism; Metabolic programming; Infant weight gain; Rapid growth; Childhood obesity; randomized clinical-trial; amino-acid-metabolism; milk protein-intake; insulin-resistence; infant formula; adipose-tissue; weight-gain; fatty-acid; metabolomics; children
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Long-term effects of early nutrition on later health
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/252201
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