One of the classical and traditional wall typology built in agricultural or pastoral landscapes are dry stone walls (walls built only of stones without concrete). These vertical surfaces are expected to increase habitat heterogeneity and to play an important role for biodiversity. This study focused on two groups of organisms: amphibians, represented by the rock-dwelling salamander Hydromantes strinatii, that are expected to use walls mainly as shelters, and molluscs, which use of walls may be affected mainly by the trophic resources available. A mountain area of the northern Appennines (NW-Italy) was surveyed to assess the differences between dry stone walls and the wall typologies in terms of morphology, surrounding landscape and salamander and mollusc occurrence; the relationships between wall typology features and salamander and mollusc distribution were assessed. Dry stone walls were more heterogeneous than concrete walls and hosted more lichens than natural rocky walls. They were more used by H. strinatii juveniles than the other walls and played an important role for their distribution. They were positively related to the occurrence of several molluscan species, including species with high ecological plasticity and rock-dwelling species. Among wall features, the most important for molluscs species distribution was vegetation cover, followed by lichen cover and heterogeneity, confirming the importance of trophic content for mollusc exploitation, while vegetated without concrete walls hosted higher number of species. The results suggest that dry stone walls can be important for fauna biodiversity and should be maintained and preserved as a part of landscape management.

Dry stone walls favour biodiversity : a case-study from the Appennines / R. Manenti. - In: BIODIVERSITY AND CONSERVATION. - ISSN 0960-3115. - 23:8(2014), pp. 1879-1893. [10.1007/s10531-014-0691-9]

Dry stone walls favour biodiversity : a case-study from the Appennines

R. Manenti
Primo
2014

Abstract

One of the classical and traditional wall typology built in agricultural or pastoral landscapes are dry stone walls (walls built only of stones without concrete). These vertical surfaces are expected to increase habitat heterogeneity and to play an important role for biodiversity. This study focused on two groups of organisms: amphibians, represented by the rock-dwelling salamander Hydromantes strinatii, that are expected to use walls mainly as shelters, and molluscs, which use of walls may be affected mainly by the trophic resources available. A mountain area of the northern Appennines (NW-Italy) was surveyed to assess the differences between dry stone walls and the wall typologies in terms of morphology, surrounding landscape and salamander and mollusc occurrence; the relationships between wall typology features and salamander and mollusc distribution were assessed. Dry stone walls were more heterogeneous than concrete walls and hosted more lichens than natural rocky walls. They were more used by H. strinatii juveniles than the other walls and played an important role for their distribution. They were positively related to the occurrence of several molluscan species, including species with high ecological plasticity and rock-dwelling species. Among wall features, the most important for molluscs species distribution was vegetation cover, followed by lichen cover and heterogeneity, confirming the importance of trophic content for mollusc exploitation, while vegetated without concrete walls hosted higher number of species. The results suggest that dry stone walls can be important for fauna biodiversity and should be maintained and preserved as a part of landscape management.
Agricultural; Biodiversity; Landscape ecology; Salamander; Snail; Stone wall
Settore BIO/05 - Zoologia
Settore BIO/07 - Ecologia
Settore BIO/08 - Antropologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/251913
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