AIM:This study aims at investigating the possible relationships between anthropometric and functional parameters and maximal serve speed in professional tennis players. METHODS:Eight professional male tennis players (age 23±4 [mean±SD] years;; height 181±4 cm; body mass 80±4 kg;; playing experience 14±4 years;; weekly training practice 29±6 hours) were recruited. Anthropometric parameters (height, body mass, arm--racquet length, arm muscle area), jump performance (Squat Jump, Counter Movement Jump;; Counter Movement Jump Free), handgrip strength and first and second maximal serve speed were assessed. RESULTS:Pearson's correlation coefficient showed significant (p<0.05) positive relationships between height and ball speed in both the first (r=0.78;; p=0.02) and second (r=0.80;; p=0.017) serve, and a significant negative correlation between serve speed and arm muscle area in first serve only (r=--0.78; p=0.03). In addition, a trend towards a positive correlation was observed between string tensions and serves speed for both first and second serves (r=0.54;; p=0.16 and r=0.60;; p=0.11, respectively). No significant relationship was found between serve speed and the other variables considered, including jumping performance parameters. CONCLUSIONS:Height was confirmed to be the main anthropometric determinant of serves speed in professional tennis players.

Relationship between anthropometric or functional characteristics and maximal serve velocity in professional tennis players / M. Bonato, M. Maggioni, C. Rossi, S. Rampichini, A. La Torre, G. Merati. - In: JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS. - ISSN 0022-4707. - 55:10(2014), pp. 1157-1165.

Relationship between anthropometric or functional characteristics and maximal serve velocity in professional tennis players

M. Bonato
;
M. Maggioni
Secondo
;
S. Rampichini;A. La Torre
Penultimo
;
G. Merati
2014

Abstract

AIM:This study aims at investigating the possible relationships between anthropometric and functional parameters and maximal serve speed in professional tennis players. METHODS:Eight professional male tennis players (age 23±4 [mean±SD] years;; height 181±4 cm; body mass 80±4 kg;; playing experience 14±4 years;; weekly training practice 29±6 hours) were recruited. Anthropometric parameters (height, body mass, arm--racquet length, arm muscle area), jump performance (Squat Jump, Counter Movement Jump;; Counter Movement Jump Free), handgrip strength and first and second maximal serve speed were assessed. RESULTS:Pearson's correlation coefficient showed significant (p<0.05) positive relationships between height and ball speed in both the first (r=0.78;; p=0.02) and second (r=0.80;; p=0.017) serve, and a significant negative correlation between serve speed and arm muscle area in first serve only (r=--0.78; p=0.03). In addition, a trend towards a positive correlation was observed between string tensions and serves speed for both first and second serves (r=0.54;; p=0.16 and r=0.60;; p=0.11, respectively). No significant relationship was found between serve speed and the other variables considered, including jumping performance parameters. CONCLUSIONS:Height was confirmed to be the main anthropometric determinant of serves speed in professional tennis players.
Body height; Factor analysis, statistical; Statistics as topic; Athletic performances
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
R40Y2015N10A1157.pdf

accesso riservato

Tipologia: Publisher's version/PDF
Dimensione 427.99 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
427.99 kB Adobe PDF   Visualizza/Apri   Richiedi una copia
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/243789
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 10
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 31
social impact