Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an extremely complex endocrine and metabolic disease, and the two major causes are impaired insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance in several organs and tissues. A non-human primate is an invaluable model for the study of human diseases due to their close genetic, anatomical and physiological similarities to humans. They are widely used in biomedical research aiming to elucidate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of different diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, age-related changes in metabolic parameters, obesity, T2DM, atherosclerosis etc. This entire project has different aims; the first is to confirm that baboons are a very suitable model for studying metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, age-related changes in metabolic parameters, obesity etc, and confirm baboons as a model in a physical activity studies related to improving health and well-being. In fact, the first study was conducted to evaluate the SenseWear® Armband (SWA), a metabolic holter used in humans to estimate the resting and the total energy expenditure in baboon and verify his reliability to estimate energy expenditure during resting and different activities also in non-human primates. The second and more complex study was related to elucidate, at least in part, the effects of a continuous infusion of a medication for the treatment of T2DM (Exenatide) in a non-human primate, in a model with impaired β-cell function, reporting a insulin sensitizing effect in the Exenatide-treated group, an increase insulin sensitivity and β-cells function and decrease in total body weight. This type of research could be extremely valuable for helping to develop potential new treatments for T2DM. In conclusion, in the first study we demonstrated that the SWA is a reliable and simple method to estimate total energy expenditure (TEE) and resting energy expenditure (REE) in non-human primate, baboons, by placing it in the “metabolic jacket”. In the second study we found a powerful, direct, insulin sensitizing effect of EXE on normal glucose tolerant baboons. These studies provide novel solid basis for further clinical trials aimed at preserving and supporting subjects with diabetes or at high risk of developing it.

ENERGY EXPENDITURE, GLUCOSE METABOLISM AND BODY COMPOSITION IN BABOONS AT BASELINE AND AFTER A PARTIAL PANCREATECTOMY AND A 13 WEEKS OF CONTINUOUS INFUSION OF EXENATIDE / F. Casiraghi ; tutor: L. Luzi ; coordinatore: L. Luzi. - : . DIPARTIMENTO DI SCIENZE BIOMEDICHE PER LA SALUTE, 2014 Mar 11. ((26. ciclo, Anno Accademico 2013. [10.13130/casiraghi-francesca_phd2014-03-11].

ENERGY EXPENDITURE, GLUCOSE METABOLISM AND BODY COMPOSITION IN BABOONS AT BASELINE AND AFTER A PARTIAL PANCREATECTOMY AND A 13 WEEKS OF CONTINUOUS INFUSION OF EXENATIDE

F. Casiraghi
2014-03-11

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an extremely complex endocrine and metabolic disease, and the two major causes are impaired insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance in several organs and tissues. A non-human primate is an invaluable model for the study of human diseases due to their close genetic, anatomical and physiological similarities to humans. They are widely used in biomedical research aiming to elucidate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of different diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, age-related changes in metabolic parameters, obesity, T2DM, atherosclerosis etc. This entire project has different aims; the first is to confirm that baboons are a very suitable model for studying metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, age-related changes in metabolic parameters, obesity etc, and confirm baboons as a model in a physical activity studies related to improving health and well-being. In fact, the first study was conducted to evaluate the SenseWear® Armband (SWA), a metabolic holter used in humans to estimate the resting and the total energy expenditure in baboon and verify his reliability to estimate energy expenditure during resting and different activities also in non-human primates. The second and more complex study was related to elucidate, at least in part, the effects of a continuous infusion of a medication for the treatment of T2DM (Exenatide) in a non-human primate, in a model with impaired β-cell function, reporting a insulin sensitizing effect in the Exenatide-treated group, an increase insulin sensitivity and β-cells function and decrease in total body weight. This type of research could be extremely valuable for helping to develop potential new treatments for T2DM. In conclusion, in the first study we demonstrated that the SWA is a reliable and simple method to estimate total energy expenditure (TEE) and resting energy expenditure (REE) in non-human primate, baboons, by placing it in the “metabolic jacket”. In the second study we found a powerful, direct, insulin sensitizing effect of EXE on normal glucose tolerant baboons. These studies provide novel solid basis for further clinical trials aimed at preserving and supporting subjects with diabetes or at high risk of developing it.
LUZI, LIVIO
LUZI, LIVIO
Baboon ; Exenatide ; Diabetes
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
ENERGY EXPENDITURE, GLUCOSE METABOLISM AND BODY COMPOSITION IN BABOONS AT BASELINE AND AFTER A PARTIAL PANCREATECTOMY AND A 13 WEEKS OF CONTINUOUS INFUSION OF EXENATIDE / F. Casiraghi ; tutor: L. Luzi ; coordinatore: L. Luzi. - : . DIPARTIMENTO DI SCIENZE BIOMEDICHE PER LA SALUTE, 2014 Mar 11. ((26. ciclo, Anno Accademico 2013. [10.13130/casiraghi-francesca_phd2014-03-11].
Doctoral Thesis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/233238
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