Marine ectotherms are particularly vulnerable to temperature changes and understanding their thermal responses is fundamental to predicting ecosystem functionality in the face of climate change. Reproduction is a key component of an animal’s life cycle; even if adults cope well with environmental change, reproductive females, embryos and larvae may be more vulnerable. Maternal responses to environmental change can have significant, long-lasting effects on performance and success of populations. We studied gravid females, early and late developmental embryos and first stage larvae of two brachyuran mangrove ecosystem engineers, Perisesarma guttatum and Uca urvillei. To assess metabolic responses and maternal effects of populations from the centre and edge of species distributions to acute temperature fluctuations, we studied the thermal windows of embryos, larvae, gravid and non-gravid females from Kenya and South Africa. The metabolic rate was measured for each life stage in the laboratory between 19 and 35°C in water and in air. Additionally, we characterised the field temperatures the animals experience to evaluate species sensitivity to acute temperature change and link it to natural conditions. Results from Kenya indicate that the metabolic rate of gravid and non-gravid females increased with increasing temperature, but gravid females had a higher metabolic rate than non-gravid females for both species. This was sustained over a greater temperature range, indicating females place high investment in viable offspring. P. guttatum late and early stage embryos had higher metabolic rates in water than air, indicating an evolutionary shift towards terrestrial adaptation. The larval stage appeared to be especially robust, with elevated metabolic rates only at very high temperatures. The data indicate that the reproductive component of these species is vulnerable to temperature fluctuations. Elevated temperatures are likely to lead to loss of fitness of females and embryos, with detrimental effects on their populations and loss of ecosystem functionality.

Maternal Investment at the Edge and Centre of Geographical Range: Thermal Tolerance of Females, Embryos and Larvae of Marine Ectotherms / B. Mostert, M. Fusi, S. Babbini, S. Cilio, F. Giomi, C. Mcquaid, S. Cannicci, F. Porri. ((Intervento presentato al convegno ECSA tenutosi a Venezia nel 2012.

Maternal Investment at the Edge and Centre of Geographical Range: Thermal Tolerance of Females, Embryos and Larvae of Marine Ectotherms

M. Fusi;
2012

Abstract

Marine ectotherms are particularly vulnerable to temperature changes and understanding their thermal responses is fundamental to predicting ecosystem functionality in the face of climate change. Reproduction is a key component of an animal’s life cycle; even if adults cope well with environmental change, reproductive females, embryos and larvae may be more vulnerable. Maternal responses to environmental change can have significant, long-lasting effects on performance and success of populations. We studied gravid females, early and late developmental embryos and first stage larvae of two brachyuran mangrove ecosystem engineers, Perisesarma guttatum and Uca urvillei. To assess metabolic responses and maternal effects of populations from the centre and edge of species distributions to acute temperature fluctuations, we studied the thermal windows of embryos, larvae, gravid and non-gravid females from Kenya and South Africa. The metabolic rate was measured for each life stage in the laboratory between 19 and 35°C in water and in air. Additionally, we characterised the field temperatures the animals experience to evaluate species sensitivity to acute temperature change and link it to natural conditions. Results from Kenya indicate that the metabolic rate of gravid and non-gravid females increased with increasing temperature, but gravid females had a higher metabolic rate than non-gravid females for both species. This was sustained over a greater temperature range, indicating females place high investment in viable offspring. P. guttatum late and early stage embryos had higher metabolic rates in water than air, indicating an evolutionary shift towards terrestrial adaptation. The larval stage appeared to be especially robust, with elevated metabolic rates only at very high temperatures. The data indicate that the reproductive component of these species is vulnerable to temperature fluctuations. Elevated temperatures are likely to lead to loss of fitness of females and embryos, with detrimental effects on their populations and loss of ecosystem functionality.
2012
Settore BIO/07 - Ecologia
Maternal Investment at the Edge and Centre of Geographical Range: Thermal Tolerance of Females, Embryos and Larvae of Marine Ectotherms / B. Mostert, M. Fusi, S. Babbini, S. Cilio, F. Giomi, C. Mcquaid, S. Cannicci, F. Porri. ((Intervento presentato al convegno ECSA tenutosi a Venezia nel 2012.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/231003
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