OBJECTIVE: It has been hypothesized that slow wave activity, a well established measure of sleep homeostasis that increases after waking and decreases after sleep, may reflect changes in cortical synaptic strength. If so, the amplitude of sensory evoked responses should also vary as a function of time awake and asleep in a way that reflects sleep homeostasis. METHODS: Using 256-channel, high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in 12 subjects, auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and spontaneous waking data were collected during wakefulness before and after sleep. RESULTS: The amplitudes of the N1 and P2 waves of the AEP were reduced after a night of sleep. In addition, the decline in N1 amplitude correlated with low-frequency EEG power during non-rapid eye movement sleep and spontaneous wakefulness, both homeostatically regulated measures of sleep need. CONCLUSIONS: The decline in AEP amplitude after a night of sleep may reflect a homeostatic reduction in synaptic strength. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide further evidence for a connection between synaptic plasticity and sleep homeostasis.

A postsleep decline in auditory evoked potential amplitude reflects sleep homeostasis / B. K. Hulse, E. C. Landsness, S. Sarasso, F. Ferrarelli, J. J. Guokas, T. Wanger, G. Tononi. - In: CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY. - ISSN 1388-2457. - 122:8(2011), pp. 1549-1555. [10.1016/j.clinph.2011.01.041]

A postsleep decline in auditory evoked potential amplitude reflects sleep homeostasis

S. Sarasso;
2011

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: It has been hypothesized that slow wave activity, a well established measure of sleep homeostasis that increases after waking and decreases after sleep, may reflect changes in cortical synaptic strength. If so, the amplitude of sensory evoked responses should also vary as a function of time awake and asleep in a way that reflects sleep homeostasis. METHODS: Using 256-channel, high-density electroencephalography (EEG) in 12 subjects, auditory evoked potentials (AEP) and spontaneous waking data were collected during wakefulness before and after sleep. RESULTS: The amplitudes of the N1 and P2 waves of the AEP were reduced after a night of sleep. In addition, the decline in N1 amplitude correlated with low-frequency EEG power during non-rapid eye movement sleep and spontaneous wakefulness, both homeostatically regulated measures of sleep need. CONCLUSIONS: The decline in AEP amplitude after a night of sleep may reflect a homeostatic reduction in synaptic strength. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings provide further evidence for a connection between synaptic plasticity and sleep homeostasis.
Auditory evoked potentials; Electroencephalogram; N1 and P2; Sleep homeostasis; Slow wave sleep; Synaptic plasticity
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
CLINICAL NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/228110
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