Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are the most frequent illnesses in pediatric age, frequently experienced in children with Down Syndrome (DS) due to the associated immune defects of both specific and non-specific immunity. Pidotimod, a synthetic immunostimulant, was shown to reduce the rates of ARTIs in children with DS, however the mechanisms associated with this effect is currently unknown. We analyzed immune parameters in DS children who received the seasonal 2011 2012 virosomal-adjuvanted influenza vaccine. Eighteen children aged 3-10 years (mean age 7.1+/-2.6 years) were randomly assigned (1:1 ratio) to receive Pidotimod 400 mg, administered orally once a day for 90 days or placebo. At the recruitment (T0) all children received a single dose of virosomal-adjuvanted influenza vaccine (Flu). Blood samples were collected at T0 and 3 months after the recruitment (T3) in order to evaluate innate and adaptative immune responses pathway. Flu-specific IgG1 and IgG3 levels in plasma samples were determined at pre-vaccination (T0), and 1 (T1) and 3 months (T3) post-vaccination. The use of Pidotimod was associated with the upregulation of a number of genes involved in the activation of innate immune responses and in antimicrobial activity. Interestingly the ratio of Flu-specific IgG1/IgG3 was skewed in pidotimod-treated individuals, suggesting a preferential activation of complement-dependent effector mechanisms. Although preliminary these data suggest that Pidotimod can potentiate the beneficial effect of immunization, possibly resulting in a stronger activity of both innate and adaptive immune responses.

Immunomodulating activity of Pidotimod in children with Down syndrome / G.V. Zuccotti, C. Mameli, D.L. Trabattoni, S. Beretta, M. Biasin, L. Guazzarotti, M. Clerici. - In: JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL REGULATORS & HOMEOSTATIC AGENTS. - ISSN 0393-974X. - 27:1(2013), pp. 253-258.

Immunomodulating activity of Pidotimod in children with Down syndrome

G.V. Zuccotti;C. Mameli;D.L. Trabattoni;S. Beretta;M. Biasin;M. Clerici
2013

Abstract

Acute respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) are the most frequent illnesses in pediatric age, frequently experienced in children with Down Syndrome (DS) due to the associated immune defects of both specific and non-specific immunity. Pidotimod, a synthetic immunostimulant, was shown to reduce the rates of ARTIs in children with DS, however the mechanisms associated with this effect is currently unknown. We analyzed immune parameters in DS children who received the seasonal 2011 2012 virosomal-adjuvanted influenza vaccine. Eighteen children aged 3-10 years (mean age 7.1+/-2.6 years) were randomly assigned (1:1 ratio) to receive Pidotimod 400 mg, administered orally once a day for 90 days or placebo. At the recruitment (T0) all children received a single dose of virosomal-adjuvanted influenza vaccine (Flu). Blood samples were collected at T0 and 3 months after the recruitment (T3) in order to evaluate innate and adaptative immune responses pathway. Flu-specific IgG1 and IgG3 levels in plasma samples were determined at pre-vaccination (T0), and 1 (T1) and 3 months (T3) post-vaccination. The use of Pidotimod was associated with the upregulation of a number of genes involved in the activation of innate immune responses and in antimicrobial activity. Interestingly the ratio of Flu-specific IgG1/IgG3 was skewed in pidotimod-treated individuals, suggesting a preferential activation of complement-dependent effector mechanisms. Although preliminary these data suggest that Pidotimod can potentiate the beneficial effect of immunization, possibly resulting in a stronger activity of both innate and adaptive immune responses.
Settore MED/38 - Pediatria Generale e Specialistica
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/227276
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 11
  • Scopus 28
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 24
social impact