Propyzamide and carbetamide are essential for blackgrass control in oilseed rape production. However, both of these compounds can contaminate surface waters and pose compliance problems for water utilities. The transport of propyzamide and carbetamide to an instrumented field drain in a small clay headwater tributary of the Upper Cherwell catchment was monitored over a winter season. Despite having very different sorption and dissipation properties, both herbicides were transported rapidly to the drain outlet in the first storm event after application, although carbetamide was leached more readily than propyzamide. A simple conceptual model was constructed to represent solute displacement from mobile pore water and preferential flow to drains. The model was able to reproduce the timing and magnitude of herbicide losses well, lending support to its conceptual basis. Measured losses in drainflow in the month following application were 1.1 and 8.1%, respectively, for propyzamide and carbetamide. Differences were due to a combination of differences in herbicide mobility and due to the fact that the monitoring period for carbetamide was hydrologically more active. For both compounds, losses were greater than those typically reported elsewhere for other herbicides. The data suggest that drainflow is the dominant pathway for the transfer of these herbicides to the catchment outlet, where water is abstracted for municipal supply. This imposes considerable constraints on the management options available to reduce surface water concentrations of herbicides in this catchment. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

Measurement and conceptual modelling of herbicide transport to field drains in a heavy clay soil with implications for catchment-scale water quality management / A. B. Tediosi, M. Whelan, K. Rushton, T. Thompson, C. Gandolfi, S. Pullan. - In: SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. - ISSN 0048-9697. - 438(2012), pp. 103-112.

Measurement and conceptual modelling of herbicide transport to field drains in a heavy clay soil with implications for catchment-scale water quality management

C. Gandolfi
Penultimo
;
2012

Abstract

Propyzamide and carbetamide are essential for blackgrass control in oilseed rape production. However, both of these compounds can contaminate surface waters and pose compliance problems for water utilities. The transport of propyzamide and carbetamide to an instrumented field drain in a small clay headwater tributary of the Upper Cherwell catchment was monitored over a winter season. Despite having very different sorption and dissipation properties, both herbicides were transported rapidly to the drain outlet in the first storm event after application, although carbetamide was leached more readily than propyzamide. A simple conceptual model was constructed to represent solute displacement from mobile pore water and preferential flow to drains. The model was able to reproduce the timing and magnitude of herbicide losses well, lending support to its conceptual basis. Measured losses in drainflow in the month following application were 1.1 and 8.1%, respectively, for propyzamide and carbetamide. Differences were due to a combination of differences in herbicide mobility and due to the fact that the monitoring period for carbetamide was hydrologically more active. For both compounds, losses were greater than those typically reported elsewhere for other herbicides. The data suggest that drainflow is the dominant pathway for the transfer of these herbicides to the catchment outlet, where water is abstracted for municipal supply. This imposes considerable constraints on the management options available to reduce surface water concentrations of herbicides in this catchment. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.
Carbetamide; Field drain; Leaching; Pesticide; Propyzamide
Settore AGR/08 - Idraulica Agraria e Sistemazioni Idraulico-Forestali
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/224865
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