We compared measurements of high-intensity activity during field-based training sessions in elite soccer players of different playing positions. Agreement was appraised between measurements of running speed alone and predicted metabolic power derived from a combination of running speed and acceleration. Data was collected during a 10-week phase of the competitive season from 26 English Premier League outfield players using global positioning system technology. High-intensity activity was estimated using the total distance covered at speeds >14.4 km · h−1 (TS) and the equivalent metabolic power threshold of >20 W · kg−1 (TP), respectively. We selected 0.2 as the ­minimally important standardised difference between methods. Mean training session TS was 478±300 m vs. 727±338 m for TP (p<0.001). This difference was greater for central defenders (~ 85%) vs. wide defenders and attackers (~ 60%) (p<0.05). The difference between methods also decreased as the proportion of high-intensity distance within a training session increased (R2=0.43; p<0.001). We conclude that the high-intensity demands of soccer training are underestimated by traditional measurements of running speed alone, especially in training sessions or playing positions associated with less high-intensity activity. Estimations of metabolic power better inform the coach as to the true demands of a training session.

Monitoring training in elite soccer players : systematic bias between running speed and metabolic power data / P. Gaudino, F. Iaia, G. Alberti, A. Strudwick, G. Atkinson, W. Gregson. - In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. - ISSN 0172-4622. - 34:11(2013 Nov), pp. 963-968. [10.1055/s-0033-1337943]

Monitoring training in elite soccer players : systematic bias between running speed and metabolic power data

P. Gaudino
Primo
;
F. Iaia
Secondo
;
G. Alberti;
2013

Abstract

We compared measurements of high-intensity activity during field-based training sessions in elite soccer players of different playing positions. Agreement was appraised between measurements of running speed alone and predicted metabolic power derived from a combination of running speed and acceleration. Data was collected during a 10-week phase of the competitive season from 26 English Premier League outfield players using global positioning system technology. High-intensity activity was estimated using the total distance covered at speeds >14.4 km · h−1 (TS) and the equivalent metabolic power threshold of >20 W · kg−1 (TP), respectively. We selected 0.2 as the ­minimally important standardised difference between methods. Mean training session TS was 478±300 m vs. 727±338 m for TP (p<0.001). This difference was greater for central defenders (~ 85%) vs. wide defenders and attackers (~ 60%) (p<0.05). The difference between methods also decreased as the proportion of high-intensity distance within a training session increased (R2=0.43; p<0.001). We conclude that the high-intensity demands of soccer training are underestimated by traditional measurements of running speed alone, especially in training sessions or playing positions associated with less high-intensity activity. Estimations of metabolic power better inform the coach as to the true demands of a training session.
GPS; acceleration; deceleration; energy cost; high-intensity; position
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
nov-2013
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/221923
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