Vpr (viral protein R) is a 96 amino acid sol. protein that is expressed late during viral replication. Recent studies have focused on the role of a mutation at position 77 that might be assocd. with the condition of long-term non-progression, but data are still controversial. Fifteen long-term non-progressors (LTNP), 19 therapy-naive HIV-1-infected patients with progressive disease (Pr), 23 HIV-1-infected patients receiving sub-optimal therapy with dual nucleoside [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)] therapy but efficiently controlling viral replication (STP) and 19 antiretroviral therapy multi-experienced patients with actively replicating virus (MEP) were analyzed. HIV-RNA was extd. from plasma samples, the Vpr region was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The Pol gene was amplified, directly sequenced and analyzed using Sequence Navigator software. A significantly higher prevalence of the R77Q mutation was evidenced both in LTNP (86.7%) and STP (73.9%) in comparison with Pr (42.1%) and MEP (42.1%), (P= 0.007). Comparing groups of patients with progressive disease (Pr + MEP) and groups with non-progressive disease (LTNP + STP) the probability of harboring the R77Q mutation was significantly higher in non-progressors (odds ratio, 5.16; P= 0.001). Our results support the hypothesis of the assocn. of R77Q mutation in the Vpr gene with delayed progression of HIV-1 disease. R77Q does not seem to be linked to a particular viral strain but might be assocd. with immunol. selection. The R77Q mutation might reduce CD4+ T-cell depletion possibly affecting T-cell survival in vivo by altering the pro-apoptotic activity of Vpr. [on SciFinder (R)]

Vpr and HIV-1 disease progression : R77Q mutation is associated with long-term control of HIV-1 infection in different groups of patients / D. Mologni, P. Citterio, B. Menzaghi, B. Zanone Poma, C. Riva, V. Broggini, A. Sinicco, L. Milazzo, F. Adorni, S. Rusconi, M. Galli, A. Riva. - In: AIDS. - ISSN 0269-9370. - 20:4(2006), pp. 567-574.

Vpr and HIV-1 disease progression : R77Q mutation is associated with long-term control of HIV-1 infection in different groups of patients

D. Mologni
Primo
;
P. Citterio
Secondo
;
B. Menzaghi;B. Zanone Poma;C. Riva;S. Rusconi;M. Galli
Penultimo
;
A. Riva
2006

Abstract

Vpr (viral protein R) is a 96 amino acid sol. protein that is expressed late during viral replication. Recent studies have focused on the role of a mutation at position 77 that might be assocd. with the condition of long-term non-progression, but data are still controversial. Fifteen long-term non-progressors (LTNP), 19 therapy-naive HIV-1-infected patients with progressive disease (Pr), 23 HIV-1-infected patients receiving sub-optimal therapy with dual nucleoside [nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)] therapy but efficiently controlling viral replication (STP) and 19 antiretroviral therapy multi-experienced patients with actively replicating virus (MEP) were analyzed. HIV-RNA was extd. from plasma samples, the Vpr region was amplified, cloned and sequenced. The Pol gene was amplified, directly sequenced and analyzed using Sequence Navigator software. A significantly higher prevalence of the R77Q mutation was evidenced both in LTNP (86.7%) and STP (73.9%) in comparison with Pr (42.1%) and MEP (42.1%), (P= 0.007). Comparing groups of patients with progressive disease (Pr + MEP) and groups with non-progressive disease (LTNP + STP) the probability of harboring the R77Q mutation was significantly higher in non-progressors (odds ratio, 5.16; P= 0.001). Our results support the hypothesis of the assocn. of R77Q mutation in the Vpr gene with delayed progression of HIV-1 disease. R77Q does not seem to be linked to a particular viral strain but might be assocd. with immunol. selection. The R77Q mutation might reduce CD4+ T-cell depletion possibly affecting T-cell survival in vivo by altering the pro-apoptotic activity of Vpr. [on SciFinder (R)]
Antiretroviral therapy; Disease progression; HIV phylogenesis; Long-term non-progressors; Resistance genotyping; Vpr
Settore MED/17 - Malattie Infettive
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/22190
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 30
  • Scopus 50
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 53
social impact