A gas chromatographic procedure with dynamic head-space purge and trap preconcentration (HSGC) and FID detection for blood and urinary benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) determination at low level exposure is described. Critical steps (sample collection, calibration, HSGC conditions, contamination control) are discussed. The calibration curve is linear in the range 50 ng/l - 500 μg/l; the calculated detection limit is 50 ng/l for all the considered aromatic hydrocarbons (AH) both in blood and urine; the within-day precision, calculated as variation coefficient (CV) at 400 ng/l and 40 μg/l (n = 6) was respectively CV = 13% and CV = 6% for all the studied analytes. The recovery rate was in the range 29-70%, depending on the hydrocarbon and the matrix (blood or urine) considered. The procedure was applied to the biological monitoring of 151 workers occupationally or environmentally exposed to BTEX. Occupationally exposed subjects showed blood AH levels of 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally exposed subjects. In white-collar workers exposed to BTEX urban pollution a significant difference in blood and urine levels of AH was observed between nonsmokers and smokers. Nonsmokers showed blood AH median values of respectively benzene = 241 ng/l, toluene = 759 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 140 ng/l, xylenes = 604 ng/l. Significatively higher BTEX blood values were observed in smokers after a median consumption of 5 cigarettes in 5 hours; observed median values were respectively: benzene = 365 ng/l, toluene = 1327 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 233 ng/l, xylenes = 794 ng/l.

A gas chromatographic procedure with dynamic head-space purge and trap preconcentration (HSGC) and FID detection for blood and urinary benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) determination at low level exposure is described. Critical steps (sample collection, calibration, HSGC conditions, contamination control) are discussed. The calibration curve is linear in the range 50 ng/l-500 micrograms/l; the calculated detection limit is 50 ng/l for all the considered aromatic hydrocarbons (AH) both in blood and urine; the within-day precision, calculated as variation coefficient (CV) at 400 ng/l and 40 micrograms/l (n = 6) was respectively CV = 13% and CV = 6% for all the studied analytes. The recovery rate was in the range 29-70%, depending on the hydrocarbon and matrix (blood or urine) considered. The procedure was applied to the biological monitoring of 151 workers occupationally or environmentally exposed to BTEX. Occupationally exposed subjects showed blood AH levels of 2-4 order of magnitude higher than environmentally exposed subjects. In white-collar workers exposed to BTEX urban pollution a significant difference in blood and urine levels of AH was observed between nonsmokers and smokers. Nonsmokers showed blood AH median values of respectively benzene = 241 ng/l, toluene = 759 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 140 ng/l, xylenes = 604 ng/l. Significatively higher BTEX blood values were observed in smokers after a median consumption of 5 cigarettes in 5 hours; observed median values were respectively: benzene = 365 ng/l toluene = 1327 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 233 ng/l, xylenes = 794 ng/l.

Biological monitoring of exposure to solven : a method for the gas-chromatographic determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in the blood and urine / S. Fustinoni, M. Buratti, R.E.P. Giampiccolo, S.M.A. Pulvirenti, A.L.P. Colombi. - In: LA MEDICINA DEL LAVORO. - ISSN 0025-7818. - 87:1(1996), pp. 63-75.

Biological monitoring of exposure to solven : a method for the gas-chromatographic determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in the blood and urine

S. Fustinoni
Primo
;
R.E.P. Giampiccolo;S.M.A. Pulvirenti
Penultimo
;
A.L.P. Colombi
Ultimo
1996

Abstract

A gas chromatographic procedure with dynamic head-space purge and trap preconcentration (HSGC) and FID detection for blood and urinary benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) determination at low level exposure is described. Critical steps (sample collection, calibration, HSGC conditions, contamination control) are discussed. The calibration curve is linear in the range 50 ng/l-500 micrograms/l; the calculated detection limit is 50 ng/l for all the considered aromatic hydrocarbons (AH) both in blood and urine; the within-day precision, calculated as variation coefficient (CV) at 400 ng/l and 40 micrograms/l (n = 6) was respectively CV = 13% and CV = 6% for all the studied analytes. The recovery rate was in the range 29-70%, depending on the hydrocarbon and matrix (blood or urine) considered. The procedure was applied to the biological monitoring of 151 workers occupationally or environmentally exposed to BTEX. Occupationally exposed subjects showed blood AH levels of 2-4 order of magnitude higher than environmentally exposed subjects. In white-collar workers exposed to BTEX urban pollution a significant difference in blood and urine levels of AH was observed between nonsmokers and smokers. Nonsmokers showed blood AH median values of respectively benzene = 241 ng/l, toluene = 759 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 140 ng/l, xylenes = 604 ng/l. Significatively higher BTEX blood values were observed in smokers after a median consumption of 5 cigarettes in 5 hours; observed median values were respectively: benzene = 365 ng/l toluene = 1327 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 233 ng/l, xylenes = 794 ng/l.
A gas chromatographic procedure with dynamic head-space purge and trap preconcentration (HSGC) and FID detection for blood and urinary benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) determination at low level exposure is described. Critical steps (sample collection, calibration, HSGC conditions, contamination control) are discussed. The calibration curve is linear in the range 50 ng/l - 500 μg/l; the calculated detection limit is 50 ng/l for all the considered aromatic hydrocarbons (AH) both in blood and urine; the within-day precision, calculated as variation coefficient (CV) at 400 ng/l and 40 μg/l (n = 6) was respectively CV = 13% and CV = 6% for all the studied analytes. The recovery rate was in the range 29-70%, depending on the hydrocarbon and the matrix (blood or urine) considered. The procedure was applied to the biological monitoring of 151 workers occupationally or environmentally exposed to BTEX. Occupationally exposed subjects showed blood AH levels of 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than environmentally exposed subjects. In white-collar workers exposed to BTEX urban pollution a significant difference in blood and urine levels of AH was observed between nonsmokers and smokers. Nonsmokers showed blood AH median values of respectively benzene = 241 ng/l, toluene = 759 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 140 ng/l, xylenes = 604 ng/l. Significatively higher BTEX blood values were observed in smokers after a median consumption of 5 cigarettes in 5 hours; observed median values were respectively: benzene = 365 ng/l, toluene = 1327 ng/l, ethylbenzene = 233 ng/l, xylenes = 794 ng/l.
Occupational Exposure ; Environmental Monitoring ; Air Pollutants, Occupational ; Chromatography, Gas ; Hydrocarbons ; Humans ; Solvents ; Calibration ; Statistics, Nonparametric
Settore MED/44 - Medicina del Lavoro
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/211040
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