Background: Only a few food allergens have as yet been identified, mainly because of the difficulty of obtaining a sufficient number of patients who are clinically sensitized to a given food. This is more feasible in the case of the oral allergy syndrome (OAS), a common form of food allergy, which is especially prevalent in patients with pollinosis. Objective: We designed a study to identify the allergens of kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) by analyzing the sera of patients with OAS for kiwi and to examine the cross-reactivity of these allergens with timothy and birch pollen. allergens. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with OAS for kiwi, a positive skin prick test response and serum IgE antibody to kiwi, and a positive open kiwi challenge test result and three patients who had OAS with severe systemic symptoms, which excluded a challenge test, were included in this study. The different polypeptide components of an extinct of fresh kiwi were separated by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by IgE immunoblotting with sera from these patients. Cross-reactivity with the two pollen. extracts was assessed by inhibition of the immunoblots with pooled and individual patients' sera. Results: Twelve IgE-binding components with molecular weights ranging from 12 to 64 kd were identified in the kiwi extract, bur only a 30 kd component acted as major allergen, being recognized by sera of 100% of these patients. Inhibition of kiwi immunoblots with timothy and birch pollen extracts demonstrated strong cross-reactivity with some of the kiwi allergens, suggesting complete identity between certain food and pollen allergens; whereas others, particularly the 30 kd allergen were only partially inhibited suggesting much weaker cross-reactivity. Conclusions: Kiwi fruit contains a large number of allergens widely cross-reacting with allergens in grass and birch pollen extracts. Nevertheless, the major allergen at 30 kd appears to be specific for kiwi.

Identification of the allergenic components of kiwi fruit and evaluation of their cross-reactivity with timothy and birch pollens / E.A. Pastorello, V. Pravettoni, M. Ispano, L. Farioli, R. Ansaloni, F. Rotondo, C. Incorvaia, I. Asman, A. Bengtsson, C. Ortolani. - In: JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY. - ISSN 0091-6749. - 98:3(1996 Sep), pp. 601-610.

Identification of the allergenic components of kiwi fruit and evaluation of their cross-reactivity with timothy and birch pollens

E.A. Pastorello
Primo
;
1996-09

Abstract

Background: Only a few food allergens have as yet been identified, mainly because of the difficulty of obtaining a sufficient number of patients who are clinically sensitized to a given food. This is more feasible in the case of the oral allergy syndrome (OAS), a common form of food allergy, which is especially prevalent in patients with pollinosis. Objective: We designed a study to identify the allergens of kiwi fruit (Actinidia chinensis) by analyzing the sera of patients with OAS for kiwi and to examine the cross-reactivity of these allergens with timothy and birch pollen. allergens. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with OAS for kiwi, a positive skin prick test response and serum IgE antibody to kiwi, and a positive open kiwi challenge test result and three patients who had OAS with severe systemic symptoms, which excluded a challenge test, were included in this study. The different polypeptide components of an extinct of fresh kiwi were separated by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analyzed by IgE immunoblotting with sera from these patients. Cross-reactivity with the two pollen. extracts was assessed by inhibition of the immunoblots with pooled and individual patients' sera. Results: Twelve IgE-binding components with molecular weights ranging from 12 to 64 kd were identified in the kiwi extract, bur only a 30 kd component acted as major allergen, being recognized by sera of 100% of these patients. Inhibition of kiwi immunoblots with timothy and birch pollen extracts demonstrated strong cross-reactivity with some of the kiwi allergens, suggesting complete identity between certain food and pollen allergens; whereas others, particularly the 30 kd allergen were only partially inhibited suggesting much weaker cross-reactivity. Conclusions: Kiwi fruit contains a large number of allergens widely cross-reacting with allergens in grass and birch pollen extracts. Nevertheless, the major allergen at 30 kd appears to be specific for kiwi.
kiwi ; oral allergy syndrome ; food allergy ; cross-allergenicity ; immunoblotting ; timothy ; birch
Settore MED/09 - Medicina Interna
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/207752
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 6
  • Scopus 90
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 87
social impact