Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is an interstitial lung disease characterized by invasion and proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle (ASM) cells in lung parenchyma and axial lymphatics. LAM cells bear mutations in tuberous sclerosis (TSC) genes. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells, derived from a human renal angiomyolipoma, require epidermal growth factor (EGF) for proliferation. Blockade of EGF receptors (EGFR) causes cell death. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells, previously labeled with PKH26-GL dye, were endonasally administered to 5-week-old immunodeficient female nude mice, and 4 or 26 weeks later anti-EGFR antibody or rapamycin was administered twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells infiltrated lymph nodes and alveolar lung walls, causing progressive destruction of parenchyma. Parenchymal destruction was efficiently reversed by anti-EGFR treatment and partially by rapamycin treatment. Following TSC2(-/-) ASM cell administration, lymphangiogenesis increased in lungs as indicated by more diffuse LYVE1 expression and high murine VEGF levels. Anti-EGFR antibody and rapamycin blocked the increase in lymphatic vessels. This study shows that TSC2(-/-) ASM cells can migrate and invade lungs and lymph nodes, and anti-EGFR antibody is more effective than rapamycin in promoting lung repair and reducing lymphangiogenesis. The development of a model to study metastasis by TSC cells will also help to explain how they invade different tissues and metastasize to the lung.

Development of a lymphangioleiomyomatosis model by endonasal administration of human TSC2-/- smooth muscle cells in mice / E. Lesma, E. Chiaramonte, E. Isaia, V. Grande, S. Ancona, E. Orpianesi, A.M. Di Giulio, A. Gorio. - In: THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY. - ISSN 0002-9440. - 181:3(2012 Sep), pp. 947-960.

Development of a lymphangioleiomyomatosis model by endonasal administration of human TSC2-/- smooth muscle cells in mice

E. Lesma;E. Chiaramonte;S. Ancona;E. Orpianesi;A.M. Di Giulio;A. Gorio
2012-09

Abstract

Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is an interstitial lung disease characterized by invasion and proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle (ASM) cells in lung parenchyma and axial lymphatics. LAM cells bear mutations in tuberous sclerosis (TSC) genes. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells, derived from a human renal angiomyolipoma, require epidermal growth factor (EGF) for proliferation. Blockade of EGF receptors (EGFR) causes cell death. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells, previously labeled with PKH26-GL dye, were endonasally administered to 5-week-old immunodeficient female nude mice, and 4 or 26 weeks later anti-EGFR antibody or rapamycin was administered twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. TSC2(-/-) ASM cells infiltrated lymph nodes and alveolar lung walls, causing progressive destruction of parenchyma. Parenchymal destruction was efficiently reversed by anti-EGFR treatment and partially by rapamycin treatment. Following TSC2(-/-) ASM cell administration, lymphangiogenesis increased in lungs as indicated by more diffuse LYVE1 expression and high murine VEGF levels. Anti-EGFR antibody and rapamycin blocked the increase in lymphatic vessels. This study shows that TSC2(-/-) ASM cells can migrate and invade lungs and lymph nodes, and anti-EGFR antibody is more effective than rapamycin in promoting lung repair and reducing lymphangiogenesis. The development of a model to study metastasis by TSC cells will also help to explain how they invade different tissues and metastasize to the lung.
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/205454
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