Type 2 diabetes is associated with risk of cancer. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance may be the link with cancer, but whether this is independent of the diabetes status, obesity/visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome is uncertain and the present study wanted to address this issue. Fifteen-year all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality data were obtained through the Regional Health Registry in 2,011 out of 2,074 Caucasian middle-aged individuals of the Cremona Study, a population study on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Italy in which anthropometric and metabolic characteristics were collected. During the 15-year observation period, 495 deaths were registered: 221 CVD related and 180 cancer related. Age and sex were independently associated with all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality rates. Age- and sex-adjusted analysis showed that HOMA-IR, cigarette smoking and diabetes were independently associated with all-cause mortality; HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure and fibrinogen were independently associated with CVD mortality; HOMA-IR and smoking habit were independently associated with cancer mortality. Individuals in the highest quintile of serum insulin had a 62% higher risk of cancer mortality (HR = 1.62 95% CI: 1.19-2.20; P < 0.0022) and 161% higher risk of gastrointestinal cancer mortality (HR = 2.61 95% CI: 1.73-3.94; P < 0.0001). Age- and sex-adjusted analysis showed that hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance is associated with cancer mortality independently of diabetes, obesity/visceral obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

Insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia and cancer mortality : the Cremona Study at the 15th year of follow-up / G. Perseghin, G. Calori, G. Lattuada, E. Dugnani, M. P. Garancini, P. Crosignani, M. Villa, E. Bosi, G. Ruotolo, L. Piemonti. - In: ACTA DIABETOLOGICA. - ISSN 0940-5429. - 49:6(2012 Dec), pp. 421-428. [10.1007/s00592-011-0361-2]

Insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia and cancer mortality : the Cremona Study at the 15th year of follow-up

G. Perseghin
Primo
;
G. Lattuada;
2012

Abstract

Type 2 diabetes is associated with risk of cancer. Hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance may be the link with cancer, but whether this is independent of the diabetes status, obesity/visceral obesity and metabolic syndrome is uncertain and the present study wanted to address this issue. Fifteen-year all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality data were obtained through the Regional Health Registry in 2,011 out of 2,074 Caucasian middle-aged individuals of the Cremona Study, a population study on the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in Italy in which anthropometric and metabolic characteristics were collected. During the 15-year observation period, 495 deaths were registered: 221 CVD related and 180 cancer related. Age and sex were independently associated with all-cause, cancer and CVD mortality rates. Age- and sex-adjusted analysis showed that HOMA-IR, cigarette smoking and diabetes were independently associated with all-cause mortality; HOMA-IR, systolic blood pressure and fibrinogen were independently associated with CVD mortality; HOMA-IR and smoking habit were independently associated with cancer mortality. Individuals in the highest quintile of serum insulin had a 62% higher risk of cancer mortality (HR = 1.62 95% CI: 1.19-2.20; P < 0.0022) and 161% higher risk of gastrointestinal cancer mortality (HR = 2.61 95% CI: 1.73-3.94; P < 0.0001). Age- and sex-adjusted analysis showed that hyperinsulinemia/insulin resistance is associated with cancer mortality independently of diabetes, obesity/visceral obesity and the metabolic syndrome.
cancer ; hyperinsulinemia ; diabetes mellitus ; hyperglycemia ; obesity ; metabolic syndrome
Settore MED/50 - Scienze Tecniche Mediche Applicate
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
dic-2012
Article (author)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/198279
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 27
  • Scopus 83
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 76
social impact