Keratinocytes play an important role in skin inflammatory and immunological reactions through the release of cytokines and response to them. These cells have been shown to direct T-cell priming by producing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12. The purpose of this work was to explore the potential use of IL-12 production to discriminate between skin irritants and contact allergens in vitro. Initially, a reconstituted human epidermis was treated with a known human skin irritant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), and a known human contact allergen, 1-chloro-2,4- dinitrobenzene (DNCB). The expression of IL-12p40 was assessed at specific time intervals by the semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). The data obtained indicated that only DNCB induced an up-regulation of IL-12p40. This up-regulation occurred after exposure to DNCB for 3 hours. Importantly, the application of SLS or vehicles did not induce IL-12 mRNA up-regulation. An increase in total IL-12 protein content was detected in supernatants of allergen-stimulated, but not vehicle- stimulated, reconstituted epidermis. To confirm these results, the effects of benzalkonium chloride, oxazolone and eugenol were assessed. At concentrations that resulted in equivalent IL-1α release, only contact allergens increased IL-12 expression, which confirmed the previous results. These data suggest that IL-12, which is crucial for T-helper type 1 cell responses, could be a useful marker for discriminating between contact allergens and irritants.

Selective induction of interleukin-12 in reconstructed human epidermis by chemical allergens / E. Corsini, E. Limiroli, M. Marinovich, C. Cohen, R. Roguet, C.L. Galli. - In: ATLA. ALTERNATIVES TO LABORATORY ANIMALS. - ISSN 0261-1929. - 27:2(1999), pp. 261-269.

Selective induction of interleukin-12 in reconstructed human epidermis by chemical allergens

E. Corsini;E. Limiroli;M. Marinovich;C.L. Galli
1999

Abstract

Keratinocytes play an important role in skin inflammatory and immunological reactions through the release of cytokines and response to them. These cells have been shown to direct T-cell priming by producing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-12. The purpose of this work was to explore the potential use of IL-12 production to discriminate between skin irritants and contact allergens in vitro. Initially, a reconstituted human epidermis was treated with a known human skin irritant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), and a known human contact allergen, 1-chloro-2,4- dinitrobenzene (DNCB). The expression of IL-12p40 was assessed at specific time intervals by the semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). The data obtained indicated that only DNCB induced an up-regulation of IL-12p40. This up-regulation occurred after exposure to DNCB for 3 hours. Importantly, the application of SLS or vehicles did not induce IL-12 mRNA up-regulation. An increase in total IL-12 protein content was detected in supernatants of allergen-stimulated, but not vehicle- stimulated, reconstituted epidermis. To confirm these results, the effects of benzalkonium chloride, oxazolone and eugenol were assessed. At concentrations that resulted in equivalent IL-1α release, only contact allergens increased IL-12 expression, which confirmed the previous results. These data suggest that IL-12, which is crucial for T-helper type 1 cell responses, could be a useful marker for discriminating between contact allergens and irritants.
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/191121
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