With a procedure that allows the renaturation of the DNA polymerase catalytic activity in situ after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have compared the active polypeptides present in extracts from organisms covering a wide evolutionary range from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, namely: Escherichia coli, Oryza sativa, Daucus carota , Neurospora crassa, Dictyostelium discoideum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ceratitis capitata, Leucophaea maderae , Xenopus laevis, rat tissues and human lymphoblastoid cells. Two main clusters of active peptides are visible in mammalian and adult insect tissues, characterized by a mol. wt. greater than 70000 and less than 50000, respectively. High mol. wt. peptides are heterogeneous in size and correspond to active fragments of DNA polymerase alpha, whereas low mol. wt. peptides show the same migration rate as purified DNA polymerase beta and are not generated by proteolysis of the high mol. wt. cluster, In the three species of fungi studied, only high mol. wt. peptides are found. The same is true in plant cells, where no DNA polymerase beta activity is detectable and the pattern of the high mol. wt. cluster is similar to that observed in E. coli extracts (which also lack low mol. wt. peptides). Also in mitochondria from higher and lower eukaryotes only high mol. wt. species are observed, and the active band(s) range from 70000 to 145000 daltons. Our results indicate that the structure of DNA polymerase has been highly conserved during evolution so that an active fragment of mol. wt. greater than or equal to 70 000 is always found in prokaryotic enzymes and in the replicative species of eukaryotic and mitochondrial DNA polymerases; at a certain stage in evolution, another species of low mol. wt. DNA polymerase (beta or beta-like) appears.

Active polypeptide fragments common to prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and mitochondrial DNA polymerases / A. I. Scovassi, S. Torsello, P. Plevani, G. F. Badaracco, U. Bertazzoni. - In: EMBO JOURNAL. - ISSN 0261-4189. - 1:10(1982), pp. 1161-5-1165.

Active polypeptide fragments common to prokaryotic, eukaryotic, and mitochondrial DNA polymerases

P. Plevani;
1982

Abstract

With a procedure that allows the renaturation of the DNA polymerase catalytic activity in situ after SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have compared the active polypeptides present in extracts from organisms covering a wide evolutionary range from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, namely: Escherichia coli, Oryza sativa, Daucus carota , Neurospora crassa, Dictyostelium discoideum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ceratitis capitata, Leucophaea maderae , Xenopus laevis, rat tissues and human lymphoblastoid cells. Two main clusters of active peptides are visible in mammalian and adult insect tissues, characterized by a mol. wt. greater than 70000 and less than 50000, respectively. High mol. wt. peptides are heterogeneous in size and correspond to active fragments of DNA polymerase alpha, whereas low mol. wt. peptides show the same migration rate as purified DNA polymerase beta and are not generated by proteolysis of the high mol. wt. cluster, In the three species of fungi studied, only high mol. wt. peptides are found. The same is true in plant cells, where no DNA polymerase beta activity is detectable and the pattern of the high mol. wt. cluster is similar to that observed in E. coli extracts (which also lack low mol. wt. peptides). Also in mitochondria from higher and lower eukaryotes only high mol. wt. species are observed, and the active band(s) range from 70000 to 145000 daltons. Our results indicate that the structure of DNA polymerase has been highly conserved during evolution so that an active fragment of mol. wt. greater than or equal to 70 000 is always found in prokaryotic enzymes and in the replicative species of eukaryotic and mitochondrial DNA polymerases; at a certain stage in evolution, another species of low mol. wt. DNA polymerase (beta or beta-like) appears.
Animals; Leukemia, Lymphoid; Fungi; Humans; Mitochondria; Organ Specificity; Molecular Weight; Binding Sites; Rats; Peptide Fragments; Plants; Escherichia coli; Species Specificity; Cell Line; Male; DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
Settore BIO/11 - Biologia Molecolare
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/191031
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