Occupational associations with gastric cancer were investigated in a multicenter case-control study in Italy involving interviews with 640 histologically confirmed male cases and 959 controls, randomly selected from the resident populations of the study areas. From information on the three jobs each person held the longest, risks were evaluated according to employment in 35 occupations (ever or 21+ years) and to estimated exposure (ever or 21+ years) to six chemicals using a job-exposure matrix. All risk estimates were adjusted by personal, demographic, and dietary variables identified as gastric-cancer risk factors in previous analyses. The only significantly increased risk was observed for sailors, seamen, and allied groups (ever employed: odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-8.0; 21+ years: OR = 3.1, CI = 0.8-13). Nonsignificant increases after 21+ years of employment were observed for forestry workers, miners, and janitors and cleaners. Crude ORs were elevated significantly among farmers, but adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors largely eliminated the association: a nonsignificant 30 percent excess risk remained for farm laborers, but there was no rise in risk among long-term farm laborers and no excess among farm owners. Application of the job-exposure matrix revealed excess risks of borderline significance associated with potential exposure to mineral dusts and nitrogen oxides. For subjects with 21+ years of potential exposure, nonsignificantly increased risks were related to mineral dusts, asbestos, fertilizers, and nitrosamines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Occupational exposures as risk factors for gastric cancer in Italy / P. Cocco, D. Palli, E. Buiatti, F. Cipriani, A. DeCarli, P. Manca, M. H. Ward, W. J. Blot, J. F. Fraumeni. - In: CANCER CAUSES & CONTROL. - ISSN 0957-5243. - 5:3(1994 May), pp. 241-248.

Occupational exposures as risk factors for gastric cancer in Italy

A. DeCarli;
1994

Abstract

Occupational associations with gastric cancer were investigated in a multicenter case-control study in Italy involving interviews with 640 histologically confirmed male cases and 959 controls, randomly selected from the resident populations of the study areas. From information on the three jobs each person held the longest, risks were evaluated according to employment in 35 occupations (ever or 21+ years) and to estimated exposure (ever or 21+ years) to six chemicals using a job-exposure matrix. All risk estimates were adjusted by personal, demographic, and dietary variables identified as gastric-cancer risk factors in previous analyses. The only significantly increased risk was observed for sailors, seamen, and allied groups (ever employed: odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-8.0; 21+ years: OR = 3.1, CI = 0.8-13). Nonsignificant increases after 21+ years of employment were observed for forestry workers, miners, and janitors and cleaners. Crude ORs were elevated significantly among farmers, but adjusting for demographic and lifestyle factors largely eliminated the association: a nonsignificant 30 percent excess risk remained for farm laborers, but there was no rise in risk among long-term farm laborers and no excess among farm owners. Application of the job-exposure matrix revealed excess risks of borderline significance associated with potential exposure to mineral dusts and nitrogen oxides. For subjects with 21+ years of potential exposure, nonsignificantly increased risks were related to mineral dusts, asbestos, fertilizers, and nitrosamines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Diet; farming; gastric cancer; males; occupation
Settore MED/01 - Statistica Medica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/188501
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