Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) embodies a group of diseases in human patients and domestic animals that are characterized by hyperplasia or neoplasia, or both, of two or more endocrine tissues. The MEN-1 syndrome is associated with menin gene mutations that induce various combinations of parathyroid, pituitary, and pancreatic endocrine tumors in humans. Two male, Domestic Shorthair cats developed symmetric alopecia, insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, and pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism at 12 and 13 years of age. Examination of skin biopsy specimens revealed atrophic dermatosis associated with hyperadrenocorticism. In one cat, cutaneous lesions consistent with paraneoplastic alopecia associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma also were evident. Multiple invasive pancreatic beta cell carcinomas, pituitary corticotroph adenomas, and thyroid C-cell and parathyroid chief cell hyperplasia were diagnosed on the basis of results of gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings in both cats. Pancreatic exocrine adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in both cats. One cat also had hepatocellular carcinoma. Exons 1-8 of the feline menin gene were sequenced and were found to bear 93% homology with the human gene sequence, and the corresponding amino acid sequences shared 98% homology. Purification of total RNA and amplification of cDNA from lesional tissues to document mutations in the feline menin gene sequence were unsuccessful. The combination of lesions observed was consistent with the diagnosis of MEN-1-like syndrome in both cats.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type-I-like syndrome in two cats / P. Roccabianca, M. Rondena, S. Paltrinieri, V. Pocacqua, P. Scarpa, S. Faverzani, E. Scanziani, M. Caniatti. - In: VETERINARY PATHOLOGY. - ISSN 0300-9858. - 43:3(2006), pp. 345-352.

Multiple endocrine neoplasia type-I-like syndrome in two cats

P. Roccabianca
Primo
;
M. Rondena
Secondo
;
S. Paltrinieri;V. Pocacqua;P. Scarpa;S. Faverzani;E. Scanziani
Penultimo
;
M. Caniatti
Ultimo
2006

Abstract

Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) embodies a group of diseases in human patients and domestic animals that are characterized by hyperplasia or neoplasia, or both, of two or more endocrine tissues. The MEN-1 syndrome is associated with menin gene mutations that induce various combinations of parathyroid, pituitary, and pancreatic endocrine tumors in humans. Two male, Domestic Shorthair cats developed symmetric alopecia, insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus, and pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism at 12 and 13 years of age. Examination of skin biopsy specimens revealed atrophic dermatosis associated with hyperadrenocorticism. In one cat, cutaneous lesions consistent with paraneoplastic alopecia associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma also were evident. Multiple invasive pancreatic beta cell carcinomas, pituitary corticotroph adenomas, and thyroid C-cell and parathyroid chief cell hyperplasia were diagnosed on the basis of results of gross, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings in both cats. Pancreatic exocrine adenocarcinoma was diagnosed in both cats. One cat also had hepatocellular carcinoma. Exons 1-8 of the feline menin gene were sequenced and were found to bear 93% homology with the human gene sequence, and the corresponding amino acid sequences shared 98% homology. Purification of total RNA and amplification of cDNA from lesional tissues to document mutations in the feline menin gene sequence were unsuccessful. The combination of lesions observed was consistent with the diagnosis of MEN-1-like syndrome in both cats.
Cats; MEN-1; Menin
Settore VET/03 - Patologia Generale e Anatomia Patologica Veterinaria
Settore VET/08 - Clinica Medica Veterinaria
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/18581
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