The development of the central nervous system is influenced by sex steroids and by their metabolites. However, little information on the possible effects of steroid hormones on neuroblastoma cells is available. Human neuroblastoma cell lines have been used as a model of human neuroblasts in vitro to study the metabolism of steroid hormones; in addition, the effects of steroids and steroid antagonists on neuroblastoma cell growth have also been investigated. The results obtained show that SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells may actively metabolize testosterone and progesterone to their respective 5 alpha-reduced metabolites and that differentiation of neuroblastoma cells is paralleled by a significant increase in expression of the type-1 5 alpha-reductase and of the formation of steroid metabolites. All these data are suggestive of a potential role of steroid 5 alpha-reduced metabolites in the biology of neuroblastoma cells. Studies performed to analyze the role of steroid hormones on neuroblastoma cell proliferation show that progesterone at low doses may induce minor stimulation, and at higher doses, a toxic effect on the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH is seen. Moreover, the antiprogestin 17 beta-hydroxy-11 beta-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl-1)-17-(prop-1-ynyl)estra-4,9-dien+ ++-3-one (RU486) decreases the proliferation of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of RU486 is not antagonized by either progesterone or dexamethasone, a result that seems to exclude the action of RU486 via classic intracellular steroid hormone receptors.

Effects and metabolism of steroid hormones in human neuroblastoma cells / R. Maggi, A. Poletti, L.A. Casulari, F. Pimpinelli, F. Piva, M.R. Zanisi, L. Martini. - In: STEROIDS. - ISSN 0039-128X. - 63:5-6(1998), pp. 257-262. [10.1016/S0039-128X(98)00038-5]

Effects and metabolism of steroid hormones in human neuroblastoma cells

R. Maggi
Primo
;
A. Poletti
Secondo
;
F. Pimpinelli;F. Piva;M.R. Zanisi;L. Martini
Ultimo
1998

Abstract

The development of the central nervous system is influenced by sex steroids and by their metabolites. However, little information on the possible effects of steroid hormones on neuroblastoma cells is available. Human neuroblastoma cell lines have been used as a model of human neuroblasts in vitro to study the metabolism of steroid hormones; in addition, the effects of steroids and steroid antagonists on neuroblastoma cell growth have also been investigated. The results obtained show that SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells may actively metabolize testosterone and progesterone to their respective 5 alpha-reduced metabolites and that differentiation of neuroblastoma cells is paralleled by a significant increase in expression of the type-1 5 alpha-reductase and of the formation of steroid metabolites. All these data are suggestive of a potential role of steroid 5 alpha-reduced metabolites in the biology of neuroblastoma cells. Studies performed to analyze the role of steroid hormones on neuroblastoma cell proliferation show that progesterone at low doses may induce minor stimulation, and at higher doses, a toxic effect on the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH is seen. Moreover, the antiprogestin 17 beta-hydroxy-11 beta-(4-dimethylamino-phenyl-1)-17-(prop-1-ynyl)estra-4,9-dien+ ++-3-one (RU486) decreases the proliferation of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of RU486 is not antagonized by either progesterone or dexamethasone, a result that seems to exclude the action of RU486 via classic intracellular steroid hormone receptors.
5α- reductase; Antagonist; Cell culture; Metabolism; Neuroblastoma; Neuron; Progesterone; Proliferation; Testosterone
Settore BIO/13 - Biologia Applicata
Settore BIO/09 - Fisiologia
Settore MED/13 - Endocrinologia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/185523
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