It has been reported that long-term administration of ethanol has deleterious effects on the central nervous system; the alterations are particularly evident if the exposure occurs during development. Our study shows that rat perinatal administration of 3% and 6% ethanol does not alter development of serotonin (5-HT) pathways in the central nervous system, while their reactive changes triggered by neonatal lesioning are greatly altered. The administration of 5,7-dihydroxytriptamine (5,7-DHT) within 6 hours from birth causes 5-HT fiber degeneration throughout the central nervous system. The loss of 5-HT is particularly relevant in lumbar spinal cord, occipital cortex, and hippocampus, This early decrease in 5-HT content is followed by a slow and partial recovery. If animals are exposed to 3% ethanol during the perinatal period, there is an enhancement of the 5,7-DHT-induced degeneration that is, however, followed by a faster and greater recovery throughout the central nervous system. Conversely, perinatal exposure to 6% ethanol and 5,7-DHT administration lead to an irreversible 5-HT loss with no subsequent recovery. The deleterious effects of 6% ethanol are accompanied by a reduced expression of neurotrophin, Thus, our study suggests that chronic exposure to ethanol can influence central nervous system plasticity during development. Low doses may enhance neuronal plasticity and repair perhaps via an increased efficacy of neurotrophic factors, whereas higher doses may negatively affect neural development also by means of the impairment of the expression of neurotrophic factors. J. Neurosci, Res. 58:449-455, 1999, (C) 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Perinatal supplementation of low doses of ethanol enhances 5-HT restoration in the central nervous system / E. Germani, M. Suck, A. Di Giulio, A. Gorio. - In: JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH. - ISSN 0360-4012. - 58:3(1999), pp. 449-455.

Perinatal supplementation of low doses of ethanol enhances 5-HT restoration in the central nervous system

A. Di Giulio;A. Gorio
1999

Abstract

It has been reported that long-term administration of ethanol has deleterious effects on the central nervous system; the alterations are particularly evident if the exposure occurs during development. Our study shows that rat perinatal administration of 3% and 6% ethanol does not alter development of serotonin (5-HT) pathways in the central nervous system, while their reactive changes triggered by neonatal lesioning are greatly altered. The administration of 5,7-dihydroxytriptamine (5,7-DHT) within 6 hours from birth causes 5-HT fiber degeneration throughout the central nervous system. The loss of 5-HT is particularly relevant in lumbar spinal cord, occipital cortex, and hippocampus, This early decrease in 5-HT content is followed by a slow and partial recovery. If animals are exposed to 3% ethanol during the perinatal period, there is an enhancement of the 5,7-DHT-induced degeneration that is, however, followed by a faster and greater recovery throughout the central nervous system. Conversely, perinatal exposure to 6% ethanol and 5,7-DHT administration lead to an irreversible 5-HT loss with no subsequent recovery. The deleterious effects of 6% ethanol are accompanied by a reduced expression of neurotrophin, Thus, our study suggests that chronic exposure to ethanol can influence central nervous system plasticity during development. Low doses may enhance neuronal plasticity and repair perhaps via an increased efficacy of neurotrophic factors, whereas higher doses may negatively affect neural development also by means of the impairment of the expression of neurotrophic factors. J. Neurosci, Res. 58:449-455, 1999, (C) 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
5-HT regeneration; FAS; Fetal alcohol syndrome; Pruning effect; Retrograde degeneration; Serotonin
Settore BIO/14 - Farmacologia
JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/185342
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