We studied the perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 70 high risk mother/infant pairs. Seventy-six percent of the mothers (53 of 70) were coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 79% (55 of 70) had a history of drug addiction. During the follow-up HCV RNA was detected in 14 of 70 (20%) infants: 12% (2 of 17) in infants born to HIV-negative mothers; and 23% (12 of 53) in infants to HIV-positive mothers. The rate of vertical transmission was significantly higher in vaginally delivered infants than in those delivered by cesarean section (32% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). All 56 uninfected infants lost passively acquired anti-HCV by age 9 ± 4 months and only 2 of 56 infants (4%) had evidence of HIV infection. Four of 14 HCV RNA- positive infants (29%) had evidence of HIV coinfection. We observed 3 clinical patterns of HCV infection: a transient viremia in 2 infants; an acute pattern in 2 infants; and a chronic pattern in 10 infants. All 4 HIV- coinfected infants had chronic HCV infection. All infants with a chronic pattern, had increased alanine aminotransferase values for more than 6 months and 5 had a liver biopsy that showed signs of chronic persistent hepatitis. HCV perinatal transmission was more frequent in infants born to HIV- coinfected mothers than in infants born to HIV-noninfected women, particularly when delivered vaginally.

Perinatal transmission and manifestation of hepatitis C virus infection in a high risk population / S. PACCAGNINI, N. PRINCIPI, E. MASSIRONI, E. TANZI, L. ROMANO’, M.L. MUGGIASCA, M.C. RAGNI, L. SALVAGGIO. - In: THE PEDIATRIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE JOURNAL. - ISSN 0891-3668. - 14:3(1995), pp. 195-199.

Perinatal transmission and manifestation of hepatitis C virus infection in a high risk population.

N. Principi
Secondo
;
E. Tanzi;L. Romano’;
1995

Abstract

We studied the perinatal transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in 70 high risk mother/infant pairs. Seventy-six percent of the mothers (53 of 70) were coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and 79% (55 of 70) had a history of drug addiction. During the follow-up HCV RNA was detected in 14 of 70 (20%) infants: 12% (2 of 17) in infants born to HIV-negative mothers; and 23% (12 of 53) in infants to HIV-positive mothers. The rate of vertical transmission was significantly higher in vaginally delivered infants than in those delivered by cesarean section (32% vs. 6%; P < 0.05). All 56 uninfected infants lost passively acquired anti-HCV by age 9 ± 4 months and only 2 of 56 infants (4%) had evidence of HIV infection. Four of 14 HCV RNA- positive infants (29%) had evidence of HIV coinfection. We observed 3 clinical patterns of HCV infection: a transient viremia in 2 infants; an acute pattern in 2 infants; and a chronic pattern in 10 infants. All 4 HIV- coinfected infants had chronic HCV infection. All infants with a chronic pattern, had increased alanine aminotransferase values for more than 6 months and 5 had a liver biopsy that showed signs of chronic persistent hepatitis. HCV perinatal transmission was more frequent in infants born to HIV- coinfected mothers than in infants born to HIV-noninfected women, particularly when delivered vaginally.
Settore MED/42 - Igiene Generale e Applicata
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2434/184279
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