Evidence that embryonic development in laboratory mammals and domestic livestock requires the co-ordinated activation of regulatory genes and a maternal contribution is reviewed. Attention is focused on the initial phase of development before implantation as, after this stage, the maternal contribution becomes more self-evident. Most embryonic losses occur during this period. The data examined indicate that the uterus produces molecules involved in promoting the cell proliferation that occurs in implantation. Oviduct activity also exists, which seems to provide the early embryo with molecules indispensable for early differentiative processes. Results from different sources are beginning to provide tentative identification of such molecules. In particular, growth factors, with some analogy to those found in amphibian embryos, seem to be involved in this process.

Maternal control of early embryonic development / F. Gandolfi, T.A.L. Brevini, S. Modina, L. Passoni, A. Lauria - In: Embryonic development and manipulation in animal production: trends in research and applications. / Lauria, A.; Gandolfi, F.. - [s.l] : Portland Press, London, UK, 1992. - ISBN 1-855-78-033X. (( convegno Embryonic development and manipulation in animal production: trends in research and applications. tenutosi a milano, italy nel 1992.

Maternal control of early embryonic development

F. Gandolfi
Primo
;
T.A.L. Brevini;S. Modina;
1992

Abstract

Evidence that embryonic development in laboratory mammals and domestic livestock requires the co-ordinated activation of regulatory genes and a maternal contribution is reviewed. Attention is focused on the initial phase of development before implantation as, after this stage, the maternal contribution becomes more self-evident. Most embryonic losses occur during this period. The data examined indicate that the uterus produces molecules involved in promoting the cell proliferation that occurs in implantation. Oviduct activity also exists, which seems to provide the early embryo with molecules indispensable for early differentiative processes. Results from different sources are beginning to provide tentative identification of such molecules. In particular, growth factors, with some analogy to those found in amphibian embryos, seem to be involved in this process.
Embryo implantation; laboratory mammals; livestock; reviews
Settore VET/01 - Anatomia degli Animali Domestici
Book Part (author)
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/184240
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