PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids and rectal diseases are very frequent in HIV- positive patients, especially in those with homosexual habits. This study was designed to compare posthemorrhoidectomy healing time in such patients, and evaluate the role of various factors related to their HIV-positive status. METHODS: The study involved a prospective series of 48 male patients (32 HIV- seropositive and 16 with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) who underwent hemorrhoidectomy between 1992 and 1996; 20 age-matched and gender-matched seronegative patients were retrospectively identified as controls. Healing times, postoperative complications, and wound infections were recorded, and the delaying effect of CD4+, Karnofsky Index scores, and HIV-ribonucleic acid were evaluated. Between-group differences were analyzed using Cox's model, Student's t-test, chi-squared test, and Fisher's exact probability test. P values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Cox's model revealed that HIV positivity and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome significantly delayed wound healing, which also correlated with the presence of infection. The healing rate in HIV-positive patients was 66 percent after 14 weeks and 100 percent after 32 weeks; the corresponding figures for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were 0 and 50 percent. All of the controls were healed after 14 weeks (P < 0.01 vs. both the patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and HIV+ patients). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV-positive status (including CD4+ counts) and the performance status proved to be of prognostic value. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the indications for hemorrhoidectomy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome need to be considered extremely carefully because of the high incidence of delayed wound healing.

Prospective study of healing time after hemorrhoidectomy - Influence of HIV infection, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and anal wound infection / E. Morandi, D. Merlini, A. Salvaggio, D. Foschi, E. Trabucchi. - In: DISEASES OF THE COLON & RECTUM. - ISSN 0012-3706. - 42:9(1999), pp. 1140-1144.

Prospective study of healing time after hemorrhoidectomy - Influence of HIV infection, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and anal wound infection

D. Foschi
Penultimo
;
E. Trabucchi
Ultimo
1999

Abstract

PURPOSE: Hemorrhoids and rectal diseases are very frequent in HIV- positive patients, especially in those with homosexual habits. This study was designed to compare posthemorrhoidectomy healing time in such patients, and evaluate the role of various factors related to their HIV-positive status. METHODS: The study involved a prospective series of 48 male patients (32 HIV- seropositive and 16 with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) who underwent hemorrhoidectomy between 1992 and 1996; 20 age-matched and gender-matched seronegative patients were retrospectively identified as controls. Healing times, postoperative complications, and wound infections were recorded, and the delaying effect of CD4+, Karnofsky Index scores, and HIV-ribonucleic acid were evaluated. Between-group differences were analyzed using Cox's model, Student's t-test, chi-squared test, and Fisher's exact probability test. P values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Cox's model revealed that HIV positivity and the presence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome significantly delayed wound healing, which also correlated with the presence of infection. The healing rate in HIV-positive patients was 66 percent after 14 weeks and 100 percent after 32 weeks; the corresponding figures for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome were 0 and 50 percent. All of the controls were healed after 14 weeks (P < 0.01 vs. both the patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and HIV+ patients). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HIV-positive status (including CD4+ counts) and the performance status proved to be of prognostic value. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the indications for hemorrhoidectomy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome need to be considered extremely carefully because of the high incidence of delayed wound healing.
acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; human immunodeficiency virus; hemorrhoids; wound healing; rectal diseases; anal diseases
Settore MED/18 - Chirurgia Generale
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2434/182652
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